Pixel 3a, no Tmobile Video Calling?

paulov

    This page https://support.t-mobile.com/docs/DOC-39951 says that the Pixel 3a is supposed to have Tmobile Video Calling , but the "video calling provisioned" toggle is greyed out.

     

    Is this something that Google "forgot", or is the doc-39951 wrong?

      All replies

      • syaoran

        Re: Pixel 3a, no Tmobile Video Calling?

        Did you purchase your Pixel 3a from T-Mobile or somewhere else?  The T-Mobile sold firmware should have video calling because it includes T-Mobile's stock dialer.  You can always download and flash the latest T-Mobile version of the firmware from Google's developer page.  It will wipe your device though so make sure you do back up your device, if you decide to attempt it. 

        Factory Images for Nexus and Pixel Devices  |  Google APIs for Android  |  Google Developers

          • paulov

            Re: Pixel 3a, no Tmobile Video Calling?

            Thanks syaoran, yes I got it from Tmobile. From your response I'm assuming that you don't have a 3a to check on yours, right? But would you by any chance know the Dialer's app full name or the folder location so I can try to figure out if what I have is really a tmobile dialer. Besides, I need to make sure the problem is really with the dialer and not a Google induced problem to force people to try Duo. That's why it would be good to hear from someone that has it working on their phone.

              • syaoran

                Re: Pixel 3a, no Tmobile Video Calling?

                I don't have a 3a and the person I know with a 3a XL doesn't use video calling and isn't close by currently.  Most devices sold by T-Mobile have the dialer app replaced with the T-Mobile dialer, which includes video calling.  Off hand, I don't know if the T-Mobile sold 3a's contain that.  I would assume yes, because the device comes locked to T-Mobile and does come with some T-Mobile ore-installed apps but it also sounds like either Google or T-Mobile have overlooked the inclusion of it.

            • snn555

              Re: Pixel 3a, no Tmobile Video Calling?

              If you're using a Pixel, a Google product, it might make sense to use Google Duo for video calls, since everyone can use that.  Tmo VC is proprietary and can only be used on Tmo.

                • paulov

                  Re: Pixel 3a, no Tmobile Video Calling?

                  Thanks snn555, but everyone has a different need. In my case the people that I care to do video calling with, are all on tmobile (thanks to me!). And it is much easier to use something already on the phone than convincing them to install yet another intrusive google app that wants to take "care" of my whole life. I've tried that route and didn't go too far.

                    • snn555

                      Re: Pixel 3a, no Tmobile Video Calling?

                      Most phones that were updated within T-Mobile to include RCS messaging also came with T-Mobile's video calling feature as far back as three or four years ago. The pixel 3 a sold by T-Mobile does not use RCS messaging. So more than likely it was not included in the dialer.

                        • paulov

                          Re: Pixel 3a, no Tmobile Video Calling?

                          bummer. Third strike on the 3a. The first, lack of wireless charging I already knew and was willing to try to live without it. I even bought a case and a receiver but I like my phones naked and I couldn't stand that case. Then I got an issue connecting with my watch, which I put in the back burner because of time constraints. Now this. I'm starting to think that the 3a and I will soon say goodbye. Not a bad phone overall but these little things are starting to add up.

                           

                          Thanks guys, I really appreciate the time and knowledge offered. I think my wife is about to get a new phone...

                            • snn555

                              Re: Pixel 3a, no Tmobile Video Calling?

                              I like how Tmo offers some new phones on EIP like OnePlus and Pixel, but they do make concessions, mainly in software.  OnePlus devices can be flashed to OE firmware to regain OE functions, but lose a little tmo functionality.

                               

                              I've heard pixels can flash OE builds too.

                                • syaoran

                                  Re: Pixel 3a, no Tmobile Video Calling?

                                  The OnePlis situation isn't too bad.  You lose RCS and Video Calling but everything else works, including dual-SIM.  Pixel devices don't really differ too much for their carrier firmware over stock.  I think in the Pixel's case, I'm guessing it's more that Google vision for the Pixel and how they promote the device as a stock Android experience, which also means carrier bloat-free, is why the Pixels seem to be basically stock outside of some carrier aggregation. 

                                    • snn555

                                      Re: Pixel 3a, no Tmobile Video Calling?

                                      Still just about every Android phone comes with Google duo if it comes with Google apps. IPhone is the only exception to automatically pre-installed Google apps for the most part. So basically everybody's already got video calling.

                                        • syaoran

                                          Re: Pixel 3a, no Tmobile Video Calling?

                                          True, but some prefer it built into the stock dialer.  I use ADB to rove remove of Google's bloat, Duo included.  Redundant apps are a waste of space.

                                            • snn555

                                              Re: Pixel 3a, no Tmobile Video Calling?

                                              I get that everybody has their own preference however if T-Mobile video calling was more prevalent across other carriers and all devices then that might be a feasible option for anybody who communicates on a regular basis with more than just a few people.

                                               

                                              However proprietary software has always been the enemy of general adoption.  For me for instance because everyone I speak to is not on T-Mobile then that option for T-Mobile video calling would never do me any good.

                                               

                                              I can remember many years ago when TMobile first introduced video calling that much like the current version,U you had one of the handful of phones available then you couldn't video call anybody and you needed to use an alternate service. This is why I find duo to be a great asset because it runs on any phone and is widely available and most everyone already has it.

                                               

                                              by the same token that's exactly why SMS is still king of texting. At least in the US.  When TMobile rolled out advanced messaging years ago it' still only worked between a handful of T-Mobile devices much like it does today. This is where you run into a problem with RCS. T-Mobile's version really isn't any more than an advanced version of advanced messaging. And because it is proprietary and doesn't work with RCS as Google would have intended it's also not very useful.

                                               

                                              it all comes down to the difference between something that is available for everybody versus something that is only available for a few people.

                                               

                                              as far as redundant apps are concerned if TMobile had a cross carrier all device platform then that would be fine but because they don't it's sort of a wasted app for those who actually have it available on their phone. So I would go with the reverse Idea here that TMobile software would be redundant however as far as space is concerned most everybody is working with at least some sort of expandable memory option if not already into the 64 128 512 range.

                                               

                                              also most all contact apps allow you to merge your contacts from various accounts into the stock contacts app. with most every phone I've ever had once I imported my Google contacts duo was already a part of that so whenever I needed to make a video call from the stock dialer I would just choose that contact and then tap on to the duo or whatever video calling app account that was connected.

                                               

                                              I know all of that was over simplified but suffice to say that if you need to contact the most people in the same fashion then you use an app that is already widely available. kind of like when people got onto Google plus or hangouts or allo. All of those services failed. That's why most everybody is still on Facebook or Twitter or SnapChat or Instagram or whatever.

                                               

                                              That said I'll go ahead and leave this conversation thread. I think my point has been made.