What phone to migrate to from Windows Phone?

mr_l84

    I know that this really is each person's personal opinion. But I'd like to hear what others have to say about those of us still using a Windows Phone. My first two cell phones were basic Nokia's from T-Mobile. Then when I went the smartphone route on my third phone I decided to stick with Nokia and got a Nokia Lumia 925 with Windows 8 Mobile. Then when an app I liked stopped getting updates on Windows 8.1 mobile I went with an Alcatel Idol4s with Windows 10 Mobile. So I've never had an iPhone or an Android phone ever. And I'm kind of stuck on what to do next, after my Windows Phone is no longer usable of course. Windows Phone is dead, so another Windows Phone won't be a viable option.

     

    But which should I get, Apple or Android? On the one hand I don't want to pay top dollar for an Apple. Sure, they're sleek and now have a good longevity record. But I feel like my phone shouldn't cost more than my laptop does. On the other hand I'm kind of mad at Google for killing the Window's Phone. Ok, so maybe it isn't all their fault. But they did help kill it by not allowing Google services on Windows Phones. Not that I'm a fan of Google services, I got along fine all this time without them or by watching YouTube in the web browser.

     

    Part of me tells me to go with an older generation iPhone. The LG Aristo 2 Plus and Motorola moto e play 5th gen are $150. But an iPhone 6s (or 6) is only a little over double that, with the potential of lasting longer, perhaps twice as long as far as being updated would go, assuming that the Aristo and Moto e play won't get any future OS updates and the iPhone 6 and 6s still has a couple years left. I mean it would make sense to me to pay more for a phone if that phone is going to last longer, wouldn't it? Plus the iPhone 6 and 6s still have headphone jacks even though they are iPhones! Woohoo!

     

    But there's another side of me that makes me want to ditch both Apple and Android and go with an Alcatel Go Flip with KaiOS. At least KaiOS seems to have a better chance of sticking around than Windows Phone did. And I'm not too happy with the reports of both Google and Apple spying on everything their users do. Microsoft and Kai probably do the same thing, who knows. Plus I like to be different. (At one time I owned an air-cooled car, a diesel car and an all-electric car all at the same time with no normal gasoline car like everyone else has.) And going to a flip phone with KaiOS in 2019 (or 2020 when my Windows Phone dies) would be quite different. I prefer to do all my computing and such on my bigger electronic devices anyway.

      All replies

      • snn555

        Re: What phone to migrate to from Windows Phone?

        Microsoft killed Windows Mobile through lack of innovation, support, and keeping up with the times.

         

        You're going to have to try both.  This is a loaded topic.  These are my opinions.

         

        I've owned both iOS and Android.

         

        I use Android because of the cost, flexibility, and wide options.  Everything from cloud space to music and office apps are free, work with each other, and are useful to me.

         

        I owned an iPhone just to see what the fuss was about. It was too locked down to be useful with my apps and diagnostic equipment.  Pretty sure, but not so innovative.  Plus, I wound up using as many Google apps over Apple counterparts as I could.

         

        Keep in mind I came FROM Android and went TO iOS.  Had I been in reverse, I'd be lost.

         

        For me, price over status symbol.  Function over fashion.

          • gramps28

            Re: What phone to migrate to from Windows Phone?

            To add on if you want timely updates and a low price point The Moto line will be the way

            to go , especially if you buy direct from Moto.

             

            Samsung and LG "tend" to lag behind in their updates , especially OS updates.

             

            The Google lines of phones get updates first but the price point is higher.

              • mr_l84

                Re: What phone to migrate to from Windows Phone?

                Thanks for the help! The updates have me a bit scared. One time I did get an Android device, an LG G-Slate from T-Mobile. I was really impressed at first. But it came with Honey comb 3.0. By the time I got it Ice Cream Sandwich and Jellybean were out. So I never could get my bank's app or webpage to work. Soon after another handful of apps stopped working from lack of compatibility. So I guess I feel kind burnt from Android from that one bad experience.

                 

                I'm not the kind of guy that upgrades just to have the latest and greatest. I've noticed that every electronic device I've ever had I've used it until it was no longer supported and apps stopped working properly. I even kept a Vista Laptop for 10 years! I changed my Nokia Lumia 925 when certain apps stopped working due to not being up to date. And now I'm looking to do the same with my Alcatel Idol 4S for the same reason. I don't want a phone that in a couple years has to be replaced because apps don't work. I'd rather pay more and get more out of the phone.

                  • snn555

                    Re: What phone to migrate to from Windows Phone?

                    Well if you're willing to pay more to get more than you need to get a Google pixel.

                     

                    or get an Apple iPhone for about the same amount of money and both of them are flag ships from their respective manufacturers who also manufacturer the operating system. yeah you'll pay about $1,000 but you get 3 years of updates or if you don't need the latest and greatest you can get a $300 phone every year.

                     

                    for me paying 300 or less every year getting the new operating system and new features is well worth it because when I had a more expensive phone I was prone to wanting insurance and that's another $180 a year.

                      • gramps28

                        Re: What phone to migrate to from Windows Phone?

                        I loved the Nexus line because they were reasonably price but when the switched to the Pixel

                        the price doubled.

                         

                        I love my Moto but after they sold to Leonovo the updates weren't as quick to roll out but it's still the

                        best phone under $300 you can find.

                         

                        I may try the OnePlus line on my next phone. Runs their own version of Android and price point a little more bearable.

                         

                        My current phone is the LG V30 but it's been stalled at 8.0 for a while but I did get them as a bogo so my wife can't complain I have

                        a better phone than her.

                        • mr_l84

                          Re: What phone to migrate to from Windows Phone?

                          Thanks for the information. I'll look into them. $300 for a year or $1,000 does sound a bit too much for me. And $180 more per year doesn't sound great either. It's hard to justify paying more for a phone than for my laptop. But if I want a phone that does what I need it to, then I need to get a phone that works.

                          • mr_l84

                            Re: What phone to migrate to from Windows Phone?

                            The more I look into this phone stuff to more your post makes sense. If I want a phone that's up to date I have to pay a premium price. Which is something that really bugs me.

                          • chatsmeeeow

                            Re: What phone to migrate to from Windows Phone?

                            I  still have my Vista and I still believe it was the most compatable system until Google became unstable.

                        • mr_l84

                          Re: What phone to migrate to from Windows Phone?

                          Just curious. What innovation, options and flexibility of Android do you find helpful for you? I'm pretty naive when it comes to both Android and Apple.

                           

                          Just following your line of reasoning on cloud, music and Office, I do have an Office 365 subscription. So I use OneDrive and have all the Office Apps on my phone. Although unless I plug in my phone dock and hook up a keyboard, mouse and screen, which I rarely do, I don't find using my phone for Office productive at all. It's like trying to drive with a 6 inch steering wheel and the windshield masked off by 80%. But that's really a moot point since I just break out my 2-in-1 computer and do my work laptop style.

                           

                          As far as music goes I've been just syncing from my computer via Windows Media Player and playing it on Groove Music on my phone. I don't know how that compares to Android or Apple except that Apple uses the iTunes app and Android probably works with WMP.

                            • drnewcomb2

                              Windows phones and iPhones can best be classified as "Network appliances". This is particularly true of the Windows phone. They were designed to provide mobile services that integrate with the developers' desktop services. How they do this not supposed to be important to the user. They provide a service, that's all you need to know.

                               

                              Android has some of that and is trending more that way but there's also an element of geekyness that allows more experimentation (and abuse). The degree to which an Android device does or does not allow this is often the subject of a certain amount of Sturm und Drang among users. As an example of this, there are quite a few Android users who overwrite the OS ROM on their devices with a different version because they don't like the factory version. AFAIK this is not a thing in Windows and iOS phones. Also, for people who are interested in things like mapping cellular signals, Android is the only real way to go. iOS and Windows don't provide the programmer with any way to access information about what type of signal the phone is using.

                              1 of 1 people found this helpful
                                • mr_l84

                                  Re: What phone to migrate to from Windows Phone?

                                  One thing that keeps popping up on my searches is that Android phones tend to get security updates only for a couple years. Would it be feasible to get an Android phone, then when updates stop flash a custom ROM on it? Does it have to be a particular phone to do this or is it possible on any phone?

                                    • sweetpeach

                                      Re: What phone to migrate to from Windows Phone?

                                      XDA Developers would be your source for the answers to this question and I think your best bet would be a "popular phone" since such phones seem to attract more developers (therefore more ROM choices).

                                        • syaoran

                                          Personally, Inwould suggest the Pixel devices for the most frequent security updates.  Unfortunately, they are some of the ugliest devices available currently.  Every other manufacturer is a crapshoot.  The more popular the debice though, the more user develoentnthere usually is.

                                           

                                          Xiaomi's Pocofone is very popular and comes in fairly cheap.  It 8s easy to root, if you want that, and there are multiple user created ROM's actively being updated. 

                                           

                                          Samaung devices aren't bad, but Samsung does try to squash third oarty ROM's.  They want you to buy a new device each year, which they encourage you by slowing your device down withweachemajor update on purpose, just like Apple. 

                                           

                                          Buying the hardware you want is the key.  Launchers and apps go a long way on Android for customization.  Launcher 10 and Square Launcher can give you that Windows Phone look and feel with ease. 

                                          1 of 1 people found this helpful
                                          • mr_l84

                                            Re: What phone to migrate to from Windows Phone?

                                            Thanks! I had seen that forum site Googling this subject and they look like a good place to go to get help with ROM’s.

                                             

                                            I suppose the problem is that there’s really no way to know if a new phone will become popular or get support for custom ROM’s until after the fact. I could get an older used phone that’s already supported. Or take a chance with a new phone. I’m still leaning towards the Motorola G7 Power, but it’s new. Maybe towards the end of the year there will be more info on it.

                                      • snn555

                                        Re: What phone to migrate to from Windows Phone?

                                        mr_l84 wrote:

                                         

                                        Just curious. What innovation, options and flexibility of Android do you find helpful for you? I'm pretty naive when it comes to both Android and Apple.

                                         

                                        what I like is each manufacturer has their own overlay on top of Androids User Interface.  each manufacturer brings about different features like a chop chop motion with the phone on Motorola to activate a flashlight, or double twist of the wrist to activate the camera.  other manufacturers like LG incorporate a stylus into some of their budget phones with big screens making them at least near productivity levels like the Samsung note series. 

                                         

                                        almost every single Android out there can run Google Assistant for which is pretty much in my opinion the best if not only search assistant ever. Every year brings something different for which the others can build on and incorporate for which at some point Google normally takes note and incorporates it into their stock system.  Outside of the proprietary features from some makers it's sort of like a big project that everybody works together on albeit separately at some points.

                                         

                                        Just following your line of reasoning on cloud, music and Office, I do have an Office 365 subscription. So I use OneDrive and have all the Office Apps on my phone. Although unless I plug in my phone dock and hook up a keyboard, mouse and screen, which I rarely do, I don't find using my phone for Office productive at all. It's like trying to drive with a 6 inch steering wheel and the windshield masked off by 80%. But that's really a moot point since I just break out my 2-in-1 computer and do my work laptop style.

                                         

                                        I have a 120 GB of free Google Drive space with docs sheets and slides for word processing spreadsheets and presentations.  I also have a 100 GB of free OneDrive space but that's for overflow.

                                         

                                        As far as music goes I've been just syncing from my computer via Windows Media Player and playing it on Groove Music on my phone. I don't know how that compares to Android or Apple except that Apple uses the iTunes app and Android probably works with WMP.

                                         

                                        I use Google music for which you can upload what used to be 20,000 songs for free I believe has been upped way higher now so I have my entire collection in the cloud and I don't have to have an SD card and I don't have to sync back and forth with my computer.  Also it's there on the network to use whenever I want to use it.

                                         

                                        If I really desired so I could use a Bluetooth keyboard and mouse using my Android and streaming it to a TV with a Chromecast.

                                         

                                        But I think what you'll find to be the biggest factor is the ecosystem for which IOS and Android are known. I have a Google home mini it can work by itself or I can tie it into other Google devices. Apple has Apple TV though not nearly wildly as used as other streaming sticks and streaming boxes or even Android TV. Apple has its own limited featured apps for productivity but most people are using their Google apps on their iOS devices for the most part. So Google creates apps that work across ecosystems.

                                         

                                        So Android can move back and forth but Apple stays with Apple. Apple has been known for its great security and privacy however in the recent months that has been proven to be rather flawed.

                                         

                                        there's a lot of things that don't translate between the two like my OBD2 scanner and Android app get work with Apple because Apple's Bluetooth policy is rather walled off. sure I could use a wireless adapter and create a wireless network on my iPhone and go about it that way but instead of it just being plug and play in simple sometimes iOS just doesn't work.

                                         

                                        I guess at the end of the day you have a decision to make so being new to these two worlds I would suggest trying out both for a week or so each on its base level without tons of apps and a whole bunch of different service accounts. I would probably start with Android first because if you don't like the phone or you don't like some aspect of the operating system you can always try another manufacturer with a different iteration of the OS however with apple that's what you get, you have far fewer options. 

                                        1 of 1 people found this helpful
                                          • mr_l84

                                            Re: What phone to migrate to from Windows Phone?

                                            snn555 wrote:

                                             

                                            what I like is each manufacturer has their own overlay on top of Androids User Interface. each manufacturer brings about different features like a chop chop motion with the phone on Motorola to activate a flashlight, or double twist of the wrist to activate the camera. other manufacturers like LG incorporate a stylus into some of their budget phones with big screens making them at least near productivity levels like the Samsung note series.

                                             

                                            almost every single Android out there can run Google Assistant for which is pretty much in my opinion the best if not only search assistant ever. Every year brings something different for which the others can build on and incorporate for which at some point Google normally takes note and incorporates it into their stock system. Outside of the proprietary features from some makers it's sort of like a big project that everybody works together on albeit separately at some points.

                                             

                                            I have a 120 GB of free Google Drive space with docs sheets and slides for word processing spreadsheets and presentations. I also have a 100 GB of free OneDrive space but that's for overflow.

                                             

                                            I see. So they are just little things here and there that may appeal to some people, and other's to other people. I'll have to look at them and see what appeals to me. I do like my camera button on my Alcatel. And I miss my flashlight button on my ancient Nokias.

                                             

                                            snn555 wrote:

                                            I use Google music for which you can upload what used to be 20,000 songs for free I believe has been upped way higher now so I have my entire collection in the cloud and I don't have to have an SD card and I don't have to sync back and forth with my computer. Also it's there on the network to use whenever I want to use it.

                                             

                                            If I really desired so I could use a Bluetooth keyboard and mouse using my Android and streaming it to a TV with a Chromecast.

                                             

                                            I mainly listen to music on the road and I drive a lot (did 20,000 miles in the past 6 months). And around here, that means hardly an cell service, if any. So I have to store them on my phone anyway. Which is also why I don't use apps like Pandora. But that's just my circumstances.

                                             

                                            Chromecast! That's the word I was looking for. Something for me to investigate.

                                             

                                            snn555 wrote:

                                            But I think what you'll find to be the biggest factor is the ecosystem for which IOS and Android are known. I have a Google home mini it can work by itself or I can tie it into other Google devices. Apple has Apple TV though not nearly wildly as used as other streaming sticks and streaming boxes or even Android TV. Apple has its own limited featured apps for productivity but most people are using their Google apps on their iOS devices for the most part. So Google creates apps that work across ecosystems.

                                             

                                            So Android can move back and forth but Apple stays with Apple. Apple has been known for its great security and privacy however in the recent months that has been proven to be rather flawed.

                                             

                                            there's a lot of things that don't translate between the two like my OBD2 scanner and Android app get work with Apple because Apple's Bluetooth policy is rather walled off. sure I could use a wireless adapter and create a wireless network on my iPhone and go about it that way but instead of it just being plug and play in simple sometimes iOS just doesn't work.

                                             

                                            I guess at the end of the day you have a decision to make so being new to these two worlds I would suggest trying out both for a week or so each on its base level without tons of apps and a whole bunch of different service accounts. I would probably start with Android first because if you don't like the phone or you don't like some aspect of the operating system you can always try another manufacturer with a different iteration of the OS however with apple that's what you get, you have far fewer options.

                                            Home mini? What's that?!

                                             

                                            More importantly, how can I try each phone? That's what really gets me. I feel like I'm shopping in the dark. Sure, I can look up the tech specs and whatnot. Kind of like knowing the horsepower of a car. But you don't know if you like the car until you actually drive it. Do I just borrow one from a friend for a couple days? Or does T-Mobile actually lend test phones?? I live 3 hours from the nearest T-Mobile retail store.

                                      • drnewcomb2

                                        If you go with an iPhone, make it a 6s or newer. That's the first iPhone to support T-Mobile's band-12.

                                        For Moto, wait a few weeks until the G7 comes out. Then compare its features to the E5. Both of these phones support T-Mobile's new band 71.

                                          • snn555

                                            Right now I'm using an X4 from Motorola with 3 gigs of RAM and an SD630 I've had really good luck with this phone the speaker is good the network is pretty strong and fast with it given its modem set plus it's very water resistant it has also battery life along with multiple bluetooth stereo setup with up to 4 speakers and I have very very few hiccups. However I am awaiting the Moto G7 Plus. I like that it has a few upgrades like the screen to body ratio, however I'm waiting on that price.

                                             

                                            This X4 was only $263 open box at Best buy unlocked and works on all carriers.  Really the only thing it's missing is band 71. However even with modest updates to the hardware there's usually some other good reason to upgrade be it Price point, design or just that one extra feature you needed. However I cannot complain about the updates since this phone started on 7.0 and is on 9.0 as of this past October. So updates are pretty decent with Motorola.

                                          • syaoran

                                            Re: What phone to migrate to from Windows Phone?

                                            I would duggest Android.  What you want in your device differs from person to person but Android is the same under any manufacturee skin and can usually be themed how you want it. 

                                             

                                            If you liked the integration between Windows Phone and your desktop, then Android is your only choice.  There is a Microsoft Launcher for Android, Edge is available on Android, Here Maps, Outlook, as well as just about everyrhing else you would have enjoyed on Windows Phone. 

                                             

                                            Android offers the ability of choice, which is what you don't get with Apple.  Outside of having options to fit your budget and personal tastes, Google Rewards also offer you a way to earn Google Play credits so you can buy apps, movies, music, and other things from the Play Store all through completing short surveys. 

                                             

                                            Whatever you choose though, choose what you feel is right for you and enjoy your new purxhase. 

                                            1 of 1 people found this helpful
                                              • mr_l84

                                                Re: What phone to migrate to from Windows Phone?

                                                Ya, Android is probably the platform I'm going to go with. For one is the price point, although I'm still a bit scared of getting an Android phone that's outdated and my apps don't work on. But I'll also have to replace 3 family members' Windows Phones once they are outdated. And going with three >$1,000 phones is like asking for a divorce. And two, Android does seem more Microsoft compatible than Apple.

                                                 

                                                I guess what two things I need to get over are 1 the unknown, and 2 just bitter feels I've had toward Google in the past. Like I said, I once had an Android device.  It was expensive, more than my laptop at the time, and very quickly outdated, practically being outdated on the day it launched. The main app I bought it for, that wasn't available on anything Windows at the time, only worked for less than a year on my outdated Android tablet. At the same time I had Windows PC longevity to compare with. Windows XP was still going after more than a decade, and the software developers I got my stuff from were still developing for Windows XP! Microsoft has been good to me since my first IBM PC with MS-DOS, whereas Google didn't seem to care if your Android device got quickly left behind.

                                                 

                                                Fast-forward to today, and I've largely given up on Google. I wasn't able to put a single Google app on any of our phones because Google never developed a single app for any Windows Phone OS. And since I only have Microsoft's Edge browser on my phone, that's what I use on my computer too. But most of Google's websites either don't work well on Edge or don't work at all. So instead of joining Google and switching to Chrome on my laptop, I've just been avoiding Google all these years, even deleting my original Google account.

                                                 

                                                But I see that Microsoft has put into practice the old saying, "if you can't beat them, join them." Windows Phone is dead. And Microsoft is making themselves available on Android. Microsoft is even going to switch from their own rendering engine in Edge to the Chromium engine for Edge. And they are making Edge available on as many OS as possible, including Android and Mac. Microsoft is practically joining forces with Google even after pouring so much money and resources into their mobile platforms and rendering engines. I guess I might as well as follow suit and do the same.

                                                  • syaoran

                                                    Re: What phone to migrate to from Windows Phone?

                                                    I am not a fan of Google or Apple.  I even remove the Google bloat from my devices because I like to use what wirks best for what I need without cluttering up my device with tons of unwanted apps. 

                                                     

                                                    Qndroid might be Google's platform but it is also open to other devwlopwrs and Google's competitors.  Apple, you arr pretty much stuck with their vision whether you like it or not. 

                                                     

                                                    As a Winsows Insider, XBOX Insider, and former Windows Modile Insider.  I did like Windows Mobile a lot and still have my Nokia Lumia 635.  I had hoped Microsoft would have done more with Danger as well to make the Windows Mobile platform better than it was. 

                                                • mr_l84

                                                  Re: What phone to migrate to from Windows Phone?

                                                  So I'm throwing a bit of research into this that just seems to cause me more confusion. I've been looking at recommended phones from experts like Consumer Reports. So far the consensus seems to be for T-Mobile phones:

                                                   

                                                  $450 and under:

                                                  Apple iPhone 7, $450, Rating 75

                                                   

                                                  $451 to $750:

                                                  Samsung Galaxy S9, $720, Rating 81
                                                  Apple iPhone XR, $750, Rating 80
                                                  Apple iPhone 8 Plus, $700, Rating 79
                                                  Apple iPhone 8, $600, Rating 79
                                                  Apple iPhone X, $750, Rating 79
                                                  LG G7 ThinQ, $650, Rating 77
                                                  Apple iPhone 7 Plus, $570, Rating 76

                                                   

                                                  $751 and up:

                                                  Samsung Galaxy Note9, $900, Rating 83
                                                  Apple iPhone XS Max, $1,100, Rating 82
                                                  Apple iPhone XS, $1,000, Rating 82
                                                  Samsung S9 Plus, $840, Rating 81
                                                  Samsung S8 Active, $850, Rating 79
                                                  LG V40 ThinQ, $850, Rating 79

                                                   

                                                  There were more phones than these on the CR's list of best phones. But these are the ones I found on their list that are also the T-Mobile store. The list could be much longer if I added unlocked phones into this. But I'm wanting to keep things as compatible with T-Mobile as possible and would like to be able to set up a payment plan for the phone instead of paying for it outright.

                                                   

                                                  So? I don't know. My tablet/laptop is a 64GB Surface 3 that cost $399 brand new, along with a $100 keyboard. So that's $500 for my tablet that's still running strong and is still fully supported and will be for years to come. The iPhone 7 is the closest thing on the list in price to my tablet. But how long until it's no longer supported and apps stop working on it? Is it just me or are smartphones more expensive, but have less longevity than laptops and tablets? Or am I overthinking this?

                                                    • gramps28

                                                      Re: What phone to migrate to from Windows Phone?

                                                      1 of 1 people found this helpful
                                                        • mr_l84

                                                          Re: What phone to migrate to from Windows Phone?

                                                          Thanks! I think if I were to decide right now, it would be this phone! So this may be the phone I get. The Moto G7 Power has specs I like!

                                                          1. It has the newest operating system and looks like it will updated for quite a while.
                                                          2. The big battery is definitely welcome! I bet my wife will want this phone just because of this.
                                                          3. FM radio is very much a plus for me. That way I won't need to carry along my MP3 player with FM radio anymore.
                                                          4. The price is much better than CR's list of stuff.

                                                          I wonder what frequencies it will support and how that might affect me out here in the rurals.

                                                          • mr_l84

                                                            Re: What phone to migrate to from Windows Phone?

                                                            Well I thought I’d report back on how it’s going. Yesterday was our first time going to a T-Mobile store to look at phones for replacing our Alcatels. I was hoping to see the Motorola G7 Power, but it’s not available yet. We basically just played a bit on a few phones. The wife is leaning towards Apple since most of her friends use iMessage, but couldn’t choose which iPhone to get. Personally I don’t know what to choose yet for myself, nothing at all caught my attention. The $150 phones feel just as good as the +$900 phones to me at the store. But I feel like cheaping out now could cause problems later on. We still have time, so no hurry.

                                                              • sweetpeach

                                                                Re: What phone to migrate to from Windows Phone?

                                                                Yeah, how many years were you thinking of keeping these phones? A few years down the road and 5G may be necessary for a "good" connection. Happy hunting!

                                                                  • mr_l84

                                                                    Re: What phone to migrate to from Windows Phone?

                                                                    How many years were we thinking of keeping these phones? That’s a good question. In 15 years I’ve bought 3 or 4 cell phones for each one of us. First we had Nokia’s (non smartphones). Then we decided to go with smartphones and got Nokia Lumia 925’s since we liked or previous Nokia’s. Then Microsoft dropped Windows 8.1 and the apps we bought the phones for stopped working. So we got Alcatel’s with Windows 10.

                                                                     

                                                                    But with the Windows Phones we’ve had to look into replacing them not because they broke or wore out, but because things stopped working. I’m pretty sure that’s going to happen again with these phones.

                                                                     

                                                                    So I guess the longer they last the better.

                                                                     

                                                                    Sent from my Windows Phone

                                                                    • drnewcomb2

                                                                      My Lunia 925 is one of the best made phones I've ever owned. I loved the hardware; disliked the OS. Now left high and dry by Microsoft, progressing into obsolescence due to new bands and lack of software support.  5G is not anticipated to replace LTE. The two will run side-by-side complementing each other. 

                                                                        • mr_l84

                                                                          Re: What phone to migrate to from Windows Phone?

                                                                          Personally I like the Windows Mobile operating system, especially Windows 10 Mobile. The animated tiles have helpful information without having to open the app or having to decipher through a long list of notifications. And you can make them different sizes depending on what’s most important to you.

                                                                           

                                                                          I’ve had all the apps I personally have ever needed. The only apps that my wife wants that we don’t have now are iMessage and FaceTime. Which makes me wonder if we both should buy iPhones. But on the other hand I want a headphone jack. I think she does too. And I have headphones i use at work, others at home, and I also plug in to an RCA port in the car. Getting an adapter, dongle and or Bluetooth device for each place seems like too much of a hassle to me.

                                                                           

                                                                          I don’t know what will happen with 5G. It sure would be a bummer to buy a phone now and again in a year or two not be able to use it. I want a phone that will last. I'd keep using my Windows Phone if I knew the apps would keep working on it.

                                                                           

                                                                          Sent on my Windows Phone.

                                                                            • sweetpeach

                                                                              Re: What phone to migrate to from Windows Phone?

                                                                              I imagine any new 4G phone would not become unusable for at least 8-10 years. By then, you'll NEED a new phone anyway; however, you may not be receiving  the "fastest" speeds since the phone does not get the 5G signal. If you're not in need for speed faster than 4G, you should be good for awhile.

                                                                               

                                                                              Also, iPhones are notorious for not offering the latest tech (read 5G) for a year or so after Android flagships.

                                                                                • drnewcomb2

                                                                                  5G will not replace LTE for a very long time. They are designed to operate together, complementing each other.

                                                                                  1 of 1 people found this helpful
                                                                                    • mr_l84

                                                                                      Re: What phone to migrate to from Windows Phone?

                                                                                      Well, looking at 2G, 3G and 4G, only now is 2G finally reaching it’s end. For a long time, even after both 3G and 4G came out, 2G was all there was in most places. But now that 4G LTE took off there seems to be more 4G coverage than 2G. I’ve noticed new places that are getting cellphone coverage that didn’t have coverage before, but that don’t offer 2G.

                                                                                       

                                                                                      I imagine that something similar will happen with 5G. At first most places won’t have it. After several years it will catch up to 4G. And maybe there will be a time that there are more places that have 5G than 4G before the 4G sunset occurs.

                                                                                       

                                                                                      Should I (and others) wait for 5G? Good question. A phone with both 5G and 4G  should theoretically be future proof. But on the other hand 5G could very well become a Long Term Evolution technology that’s continuously being improved and broadened with new bands and frequencies. Therefore an early 5G phone may not be as future proof as one would expect.

                                                                                       

                                                                                      Imagine the frustration if you bought a 5G phone in an area that still doesn’t have 5G. But when 5G finally comes to your community, it’s on a band not supported by your 5G phone.

                                                                                       

                                                                                      Anyhow, back to my gripe about phone longevity. It’s not that i expect the phone to last 10 years or more. But that I’d like to upgrade my phone when I feel like I need an upgrade, not when a manufacturer decides I need an upgrade by artificially making the phone obsolete.

                                                                                       

                                                                                      This has already happened to us 4 times. Once with my LG G-Slate with Android Honeycomb (3.0), once with my Wife iPad 1 and twice with Microsoft, our Nokia Lumia 925’s with Windows 8.1 and now our Alcatel Idol4S’s with Windows 10.

                                                                                       

                                                                                      I’d like my phone to work until I’m ready for the next thing. Like when i traded my little Nokia 1201 candy bar in for my first Smartphone, the Nokia Lumia 925.

                                                                                       

                                                                                      However, from what I can research, it looks like any new phone with the latest operating system should last 5 years or better if cared for properly. That seems reasonable to me.

                                                                        • syaoran

                                                                          Re: What phone to migrate to from Windows Phone?

                                                                          Although just about every manufacturer does it.  iPhine's tend to feel the impact more with updates and slowdowns once a newer device is released versus Android.  Custom ROM's for Android devicee also greatly prolong the lifecycle of the device software well after the manufacturer doesn't, usually after a few years.  With Android, you also have choice with the Play Store or Amazon for official store options to purchase from as well as have access to plenty of free choices.  There are lots of good free apps in the Apple store as well, but you are locked into Apple's ecosystem.

                                                                           

                                                                          Anyone, including review sites can tell you what is best in their opinion but only you can decide what the best choice is for you.  If you are looking for a cheaper option.  Swappa sells new and used devices, which are IMEI and ESN checked before they are posted for sale.  You can find some decent deals on there, especially with new Samsung flagship devices coming out soon. 

                                                                          1 of 1 people found this helpful
                                                                        • sweetpeach

                                                                          Re: What phone to migrate to from Windows Phone?

                                                                          I did what you are doing more than 7 years ago... I loved my windows mobile phone (HTC HD2)! But, alas, Windows Mobile phone died.... I searched everything I could find because I had an awful experience with an iPhone 3S (Apple allows NO customization! ) I had been hacking my phone for years to customize the color of the apps, backgrounds, etc. and that stupid thing (iPhone) opened on the apps page without the option to have folders! UGH! or have a home screen! Double UGH! If you are even a little bit geeky, GET ANDROID! Though, Android is now super user friendly, it still offers customization to all levels of expertise (or not). The truth is after 4 years with Android I was loading a Samsung Note 7 ROM on my Note 3  with ODIN and only bought a Note 8 for the more modern Tmobile band 66. You can upgrade the software, but the hardware is what it is.

                                                                           

                                                                          Furthermore, you said you sometimes are beyond the reaches of towers... GET ANDROID with an SD Card! You can download EVERYTHING onto your phone (maps, music, pics, websites to read later, anything) and still use the phone without connection. Apple does absolutely everything by syncing with their cloud and if you want more room on your phone you must upgrade while most android phones have sd card slots so you can take it all with you. Apple phones EAT data because they're always getting your info from the cloud.

                                                                           

                                                                          I MUST CAUTION YOU MOST ... GET A PHONE WITH BANDS 66 & 71 Otherwise, you run the risk of not being able to connect in all places in the next couple of years.

                                                                          1 of 1 people found this helpful
                                                                            • mr_l84

                                                                              Re: What phone to migrate to from Windows Phone?

                                                                              One thing I would like to know is if there is any way to "test drive" some of these phones. Any suggestions? I keep hearing how customizable Android is. But that means about as much as telling me how many seat positions a car has. It may be something I really like and feel I really need once I try it. But until I've tested it out myself I have no real idea of why I would need it.

                                                                               

                                                                              What's important to me:

                                                                              1. Longevity. I find I replace things when they stop working, not when the next best thing comes along.
                                                                              2. Support for my apps. I have one main important app that's supported on all currently supported OS's right now except maybe KaiOS and is useless if it doesn't get support. But the key word is currently supported. Windows 8, the iPhone 4 and I believe 5 and older Androids do not receive support for this app even though they used to.
                                                                                • syaoran

                                                                                  Re: What phone to migrate to from Windows Phone?

                                                                                  Not so much test drive out of demos in stores and borrowing friend's phones, but YouTube unboxings and reviews might help a little.  One aspect of Android that is always an option though, is Nova Launcher.  Regardless of the Android device you have, Nova Laincher offers you the ability to configure the launcher however you want and can basically emulate any devices look and feel easily enough.   

                                                                                   

                                                                                  If you have the cash, Amazon might be the best option to try different devices thanks to their excellent return policies.  BestBuy usually has more phones on display with working demos.  

                                                                                  1 of 1 people found this helpful
                                                                              • mr_l84

                                                                                Re: What phone to migrate to from Windows Phone?

                                                                                Ok. So I've done what research I could about the Motorola Moto G7. As far as I could research it is a midrange phone with average midrange specs. It seems to support most all of T-Mobile's bands and frequencies with the exception of band 5. 66 and 71 are supported.

                                                                                 

                                                                                A lot of reviews about the phone I saw give the G7 Power (or all G7's) a low rating and often recommend Xiaomi and Hueiwua phones over Motorola phones such as the Pocophone F1, the Mate 10 Lite, and the Redmi Note 6 and 7. But seeing how those phones are aimed more towards countries other than the US, I can't find any unlocked versions of those phones that have support for more than one or two of T-Mobile's bands, if any, and bands 66 and 71 are never included. But the good thing about the mediocre specs of the Moto G7 Power in comparison with these other phones is that I'm not needing a high spec phone. As long as it runs my apps, I don't care if it has a Snapdragon 632, 720 LCD display and mediocre camera.

                                                                                 

                                                                                The good I saw about the phone is of course the battery life. It looks like 3,500mAh to 4,000mAh is considered about average, so the 5,000mAh of the G7 Power is better than average. And supposedly it's lower spec processor and screen also increase battery life. Hurray!

                                                                                 

                                                                                Another good thing is that it's running stock Android with apparently zero bloatware. It comes with 9 Pie and will very likely be upgraded to 10 Q(food name?). But it probably won't be upgraded past that version of Android OS. But it still will likely receive security updates for several years to come. It's life expectancy is around 5 years, about a year less than an iPhone.

                                                                                 

                                                                                The price is supposedly going to start around $250. But it seems that Motorola phones tend to drop in price not long after inicial release.

                                                                                 

                                                                                I still have to compare this phone against some of the other T-Mobile phones, but it looks like I'm interested in it. I'll let my wife decide what phone she wants for replacing her Windows 10 phone. She may want an iPhone.

                                                                                 

                                                                                As far as me trying phones hands on I do live at least 3 hours from the nearest T-Mobile store. But I still have until December before our current phones lose free support from Microsoft. (Apparently we could continue to receive support from Microsoft for a fee after that!) And by that time we will have ventured into the city on quite a few occasions, so we'll be able to look at the G7 Power and other phones in person.

                                                                                 

                                                                                Most of my family and friends all have iPhones or the most expensive Samsungs. So I don't know what kind of help I'll get from them as far as trying out phones goes.

                                                                                  • sweetpeach

                                                                                    Re: What phone to migrate to from Windows Phone?

                                                                                    I'd caution you to check out EVERY T-Mobile deal online before deciding to buy. Right now, there are BOGO deals for the LG Phones like ThinQ,etc. ... that's $325 ea. So ALL kinds of "expensive" phones can drop to the mid-range price once you look at DEALS. Just keep an eye out for your faves. AND that you need two phones can end up working to your advantage!

                                                                                    1 of 1 people found this helpful
                                                                                      • mr_l84

                                                                                        Re: What phone to migrate to from Windows Phone?

                                                                                        That sounds like a good idea! At least I have time to look this stuff up. This is why I'm starting to look now, about 10 months from the end of Windows Phone (more or less, depending when app support ends for key apps.)

                                                                                         

                                                                                        Another thing that pops up in my mind. What about 5G? Would it be worth it to wait until 5G phones come out? Not that we need a lot of data. We're still on a 2GB per month Simple Choice plan. Of course on the other hand, once 5G comes out I would guess the price of 4G phones would drop.

                                                                                          • syaoran

                                                                                            Re: What phone to migrate to from Windows Phone?

                                                                                            Although a matternof oersonal opinion.  LG devices aren't worth flagship oricing, even on most BOGO offers.  They take forever to get updates!  The V30, which was their last decent phone in my ooinion, will be lucky to get Android Pie by July of this year.  LG's skin of the Android UI is very hit and miss with people.  I like it but most don't seem to.  It is heavily themed and has a built in theme engine to easily change the look of the device.  There is a PixelizeD theme that goves you the Pixel dark experience for free in thenPlay Store.  All if the newer LG devices have a notch where the V30 doesn't.  The V50 will bring back the stylish and notchless look of the V30, but that won't be coming out until the 2019 holiday season.

                                                                                             

                                                                                            However... you can pick up a T-Mobile version of the V30 in mint condition on Swappa for around $250.  It supports band 71, has an excellent rear ultra-wide (130 degrees) camera, and is actually worth it for that price and not too bad to spend on a devics to see if you actually like the Android platform enough to stick with it. 

                                                                                            1 of 1 people found this helpful
                                                                                              • mr_l84

                                                                                                Re: What phone to migrate to from Windows Phone?

                                                                                                In total I've owned two Android devices, both tablets. One was the LG G-Slate. It was never updated from Android 3.0 Honeycomb. I replaced that with a Samsung Tab 3. I made the mistake of letting the battery die on it one day and I never could get it to turn on again. I bought both out of warranty so my money was lost. I still have both sitting in a drawer somewhere. From then on I went all Windows, both with phone and tablet.

                                                                                                 

                                                                                                Obviously that may have nothing to do with modern phones. But my past experience does kind of turn me off from LG and Samsung, and even kind of makes me not want Android all together. But I don't like Apple either.

                                                                                        • mr_l84

                                                                                          Re: What phone to migrate to from Windows Phone?

                                                                                          I just found out that the Moto G7 Power will come in a 64GB Memory/4GB RAM version, which would be more of my preference even if it costs more. I'm not sure if T-Mobile will offer this version or only the 32GB/3GB version though.

                                                                                          • mr_l84

                                                                                            Re: What phone to migrate to from Windows Phone?

                                                                                            Something I’ve googled but don’t seem to get a clear answer for is how long are Android versions supported? One source said Android 5 Lollipop was still supported and getting security patches and such. Another said that only Nougat, Oreo, Pie and the soon to be released 9 Q are still supported. My favorite App still supports Kitkat.

                                                                                            • mr_l84

                                                                                              Re: What phone to migrate to from Windows Phone?

                                                                                              I just saw the Motorola Moto G7 Power on the T-Mobile website and I’m excited! It will get Android Q, has the longest lasting battery that PhoneArena has ever tested (3 days normal use) and costs around $235! I’m going down to the city next weekend. Hopefully it will be in a T-Mobile store there and I’ll have chance to look at it.

                                                                                              • mr_l84

                                                                                                Re: What phone to migrate to from Windows Phone?

                                                                                                Ok. So after all this research I myself am still leaning towards the Motorola Moto G7 Power, although I'm somewhat enticed to get a Google Pixel 3A. As far as my wife goes, she may go for the iPhone 7, but a Pixel 3A or 3A XL aren't out of the question for her.

                                                                                                 

                                                                                                The G7 Power seems right for me because I like the battery life, FM radio and the SD card expandability as well as supporting all of T-Mobile's LTE bands. What I don't like about it is its big size and the short year or two of security updates it will get. But for the price, it's not a bad deal compared to other smartphones.

                                                                                                 

                                                                                                The Pixel 3A is attractive to me simply for the longer 3 years of security updates and the larger 64GB internal storage since internal always seems to work better than SD cards. But 64GB is still a bit small for me, and there's no SD card slot on this phone. So it's a more-internal for less-external compromise. I might enjoy the better photos on the Pixel 3A, but I'm not much of a picture taking kind of guy.

                                                                                                 

                                                                                                My wife is the photographer in our family. So she may go for either Pixel, but she also has an iPad and a lot of Apple using friends. But both of us are quite frugal people and can't see spending over $500 on a phone. My wife even complains about the $237.50 Moto G7 Power being too expensive. We may go for a payment plan this time.

                                                                                                  • sweetpeach

                                                                                                    Re: What phone to migrate to from Windows Phone?

                                                                                                    Both of my kids think the camera on the LG Thin7 is great. My daughter enjoyed the camera on the LG G5 prior to that so that speaks well for LG cameras.

                                                                                                      • mr_l84

                                                                                                        Re: What phone to migrate to from Windows Phone?

                                                                                                        Do you mean the LG G7 ThinQ? I see it’s comparable to the Pixel 3A. My only gripe is that my first and only Android was an LG (G-Slate). But despite being having spectacular hardware for it’s time it was soon outdated to the point the main app I bought it for wouldn’t work on it anymore. The LG ThinQ apparently comes with Oreo, and might be upgraded to Pie.

                                                                                                         

                                                                                                        It was this whole short support life on Android that pushed me to Windows Phones in the first place. Maybe I’m also a bit confused about security updates. With PC’s, when an operating system comes to it’s end of system updates then sirens go off and life boats are deployed as everyone shouts to one another “Abandon Ship!!” But with smartphones, you go to your store to buy one and find several with last years version of the operating system and no guarantee that you’ll get even just security updates through the two years it takes you to pay off the phone. I'm not sure if that’s something to worry about or not.

                                                                                                          • sweetpeach

                                                                                                            Re: What phone to migrate to from Windows Phone?

                                                                                                            Our LG G5 was updated to Oreo 3 months ago; that would be 3 years since it came out.

                                                                                                             

                                                                                                            As far as security updates go, an OS update may not necessarily be needed to secure the phone. Often security updates don't change the Android version at all.

                                                                                                              • mr_l84

                                                                                                                Re: What phone to migrate to from Windows Phone?

                                                                                                                That's good to hear that LG is still pushing updates and even version upgrades after 3 years. Maybe I’ll consider them too.

                                                                                                                 

                                                                                                                I do understand that versions and security updates are different things, and that Google makes security updates available for their current versions of Android monthly.

                                                                                                                 

                                                                                                                However, I say “makes available” because when Google releases an update there’s usually no guarantee that your phone will get it any time soon, or even at all.

                                                                                                                 

                                                                                                                From what I’ve researched, each phone manufacturer takes Android and makes a custom operating system out of it. In other words, the “skins” of each manufacturer aren’t really “skins” but rather custom operating systems. Then phone carriers, like T-Mobile, take those custom operating systems and further customize them.

                                                                                                                 

                                                                                                                What that means for updates is that when Google makes an update it’s not automatically installed on all phones with that version of Android. Instead, each phone manufacturer has to first integrate the new update into their custom operating system. Then it’s the carrier’s turn to do the same. This is why updates, like version upgrades but also security updates, are pushed by carriers and can be delayed from the original update months or even over a year later. For an example, how long was Oreo and even Pie out by the time you got Oreo on your daughter's phone?

                                                                                                                 

                                                                                                                The problem is that there’s not much, if anything in writing as to what all this means for the end user, at least from what I can find. The only phones guaranteed to get security updates are the ones on the Android One and Enterprise programs. But even they only have to commit to 2 years of updates pushed only once every 3 months. Pixels are said to get timely updates for at least three years. IPhones seem to be going for about four years of updates, but even they aren’t guaranteed to get them and people can only guess which ones will get the next update or not.

                                                                                                                 

                                                                                                                This is so different from Microsoft and Windows, where you can go to their support page and see exactly how long each of their operating system versions are going to be supported and updated. I know the exact date when my Windows Phone is going to lose support, December 20, 2019. I know when Windows 7 and 8.1 will also lose support. And it doesn’t matter if I have a Dell or a Gateway or an HP. They all receive the same updates at the same times.

                                                                                                                 

                                                                                                                I do understand there is a work around for Android devices, namely rooting the phone and installing a custom ROM, which is something I might try. But on the other hand there doesn’t seem to be much fuss from consumers about this funky way of updating (or not updating) Android Phones. So maybe I’m just making this bigger than it really is.

                                                                                                                  • mr_l84

                                                                                                                    Re: What phone to migrate to from Windows Phone?

                                                                                                                    So I got a used phone, an LG G3, and ended up bricking it the first day I got it.

                                                                                                                     

                                                                                                                    Basically I found a Linus Tech Tips video where he took an LG G3 and put a custom ROM on it called LineageOS. Well, I tried it and made a mistake by flashing an older version of some recovery software instead of the newest version (called TWRP v3.3.1).  The phone and new battery cost me under $70, so I didn't lose too much.

                                                                                                                     

                                                                                                                    I  may keep fiddling with it for a while, but if I can't get it working I may just buy another one and this time just keep it stock, although it will be outdated and insecure.

                                                                                                                     

                                                                                                                    With the exception of the $50 loss from bricking one phone, if I get these for my wife and other family members they're less than half the price of T-Mobile's cheapest new smartphones that are also apparently not receiving security updates.

                                                                                                                     

                                                                                                                    Otherwise it's a tie between the Motorola G7 Power, the Google Pixel 3A and the iPhone XR, all of which seem to work out to the same price-per-year if you figure on keeping the phone until it's no longer supported.

                                                                                                                      • mr_l84

                                                                                                                        Re: What phone to migrate to from Windows Phone?

                                                                                                                        I wonder how many other people brick their first Android phone the first day they get it. Maybe I set a new record.

                                                                                                                          • syaoran

                                                                                                                            Re: What phone to migrate to from Windows Phone?

                                                                                                                            That is half the fun of getting a new toy!  Soft-bricking is easy to fix though but some LG devices can be a massive pain.  I hard-bricked a V30 on purpose to save others from making that mistake.  It's one of those things where people don't believe it will happen until someone proves it, so I did!    DDarn you, LG, and your RSA keys. 

                                                                                                                              • mr_l84

                                                                                                                                Re: What phone to migrate to from Windows Phone?

                                                                                                                                Thanks for the encouragement! And I’m still optimistic about this phone.

                                                                                                                                 

                                                                                                                                I believe I either need to find a way of getting a ROM, any ROM, to install through this version of TWRP (2.7), or to figure out how to flash the newest version of TWRP (3.3) if possible on it so that I can get LineageOS installed without the errors I’m getting.

                                                                                                                                 

                                                                                                                                The problem is I’m new to all of this, so I'm not really sure of everything. I posted my problem on XDA Developers but in 3 days only got 30 views and no replies. I guess this phone is old news to most people. I’ll keep googling and trying to make sense of where to go from here, and hopefully I can pull it off. But it would be nice to have someone hold my hand through this so to speak.

                                                                                                                • deacon

                                                                                                                  Re: What phone to migrate to from Windows Phone?

                                                                                                                  oh the memories of Windows Phones.

                                                                                                                    • mr_l84

                                                                                                                      Re: What phone to migrate to from Windows Phone?

                                                                                                                      Well this morning I tried to install the original Marshmallow via TWRP and ended up hard bricking the LG G3. So I’ve officially given up on that idea.

                                                                                                                       

                                                                                                                      Next!

                                                                                                                        • syaoran

                                                                                                                          Re: What phone to migrate to from Windows Phone?

                                                                                                                          TWRP isn't bad for dirty flashing bur to restore a device, TWRP is never the way to do so.  What makes you think you are hars bricked?  LG Up/LG Bridge is always the best way to retuen to stock.  If you can still boot TWRP, you still might be able to recover it though. 

                                                                                                                            • mr_l84

                                                                                                                              Re: What phone to migrate to from Windows Phone?

                                                                                                                              Believe me, I’ve tried LG UP, LG Bridge, and LG Flash Tool, and they do nothing. Before trying to flash the stock ROM back on with TWRP the only thing I could do was boot to TWRP recovery. But I couldn’t get any of the LG programs I mentioned to work then nor now. And now the phone does nothing. I can’t get the screen to show a thing and connecting it to my computer only comes across as unknown device.

                                                                                                                               

                                                                                                                              And I’m sure I have all the drivers installed. And I know how to get into download mode on a working phone. I know because I did it when I first got the phone and I used LG UP to flash the original KitKat on it. But ever since I tried to flash LineageOS on it I haven’t gotten neither LG UP nor anything else to work. I’ve followed every suggestion i could find on XDA Developers and several other sites, even trying every suggestion on each of my 5 usb ports. The only trying I haven’t tried is doing this on another computer because I don't have another computer.

                                                                                                                               

                                                                                                                              It’s bricked and won't turn on at all. No recovery, no download mode, no nothing!

                                                                                                                              • mr_l84

                                                                                                                                Re: What phone to migrate to from Windows Phone?

                                                                                                                                Well I just got an email from the JTAG shop that my LG G3 is fixed and on it’s way to my address by mail.

                                                                                                                                 

                                                                                                                                The question is, do I attempt for a second time to put LineageOS Oreo on it or just keep it stock Marshmallow? I feel like I’ve identified the mistakes I made that bricked it when I tried flashing over LineageOS and have a much better idea of what is involved. But on the other hand, I don’t want to keep paying for unbricking the phone if I end up messing it up again.

                                                                                                                                 

                                                                                                                                Decisions, decisions…

                                                                                                                                  • sweetpeach

                                                                                                                                    Re: What phone to migrate to from Windows Phone?

                                                                                                                                    Marshmallow is not secure or updated anymore. However, flashing is always a risk..... It's up to you.

                                                                                                                                      • mr_l84

                                                                                                                                        Re: What phone to migrate to from Windows Phone?

                                                                                                                                        Well, I got this phone  in order to try to put LineageOS on it, so I think I'm going to try it again.  For one because if I can do it, I have 3 family members who would like to try it too. Second, because I feel  that new phones including Android phones, should last for more than 2 or 3 years. And third, because I'm cheap, and the  idea of getting a $45 used phone to work nearly as good as a new phone appeals to me.

                                                                                                                                        • mr_l84

                                                                                                                                          Re: What phone to migrate to from Windows Phone?

                                                                                                                                          I'm so happy!!! I'm so happy!!! I'm so happy!!!

                                                                                                                                          I finally got LineageOS installed and working on my LG G3! I did have to have it first reset by a JTAG repair shop for $35. Right now LineageOS is still looking for updates. But it's working! The LineageOS site says this phone is getting nightly updates. And since Lineage still supports the LG G2, this phone should be supported at least for another year. Not bad for a phone that cost me $45! (Ya, I'm cheap.)

                                                                                                                                           

                                                                                                                                          So I have two removeable batteries, a 1440 "Retina" screen, NFC, wireless charging, Android Oreo, Security updates! What else could a guy want!

                                                                                                                                           

                                                                                                                                          It's working! I just made my first phone call on it!