If you are using LINUX may I have your comments?

dc5fan

    I am getting a little burned out on Windows 10. A friend of mine uses LINUX, and he raves about it. Was it a smooth transition? Would really appreciate good and bad comments.Thanks!

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      • snn555

        Re: If you are using LINUX may I have your comments?

        Way back when...I used Redhat, Mint, Ubuntu (best imo) and Suse and a few others.

         

        Back then it wasn't what it is now.  So much easier for the novice now to install dual boot win/Lin from a USB drive, or test drive a live version without a permanent install.

         

        I really haven't touched my (now win10) PC but maybe once a month since getting my Moto Droid 2 in December 2010.

        1 of 1 people found this helpful
        • smplyunprdctble

          A lot of it is what you do on your PC.

           

          I'm in the boat of being ready for a new laptop.  I started going through everything I do on it.  My home usage is probably 90% web browsing (Chrome), 8% watching video from network shares (MPC-HC), and probably 2% Other (like Fitbit Sync, screen capturing, etc).

           

          I was about to say "I can do all that in Linux", until I just remembered one of the 2% is MediaMonkey.  I use it to rip and organize my CDs.  Not as much play them because I use Subsonic for that.

           

          With my current laptop, I kinda shifted over to Google Docs for the (very few) Office-like things I need (basically things with no features).  OpenOffice / LibreOffice are decent Office alternatives but make you feel like you're using Office 2003 sometimes.  Most of the world lives in the web browsers, and there's tons of flavors of them for Linux.

           

          The hardest "getting used to" back in the day was privileged account vs user account.  But, Microsoft finally put folks down to "user" (until the user got tired of the "are you sure you want to do this to your computer" box), so it gives folks a little more "yeah, that works".  Now, the hardest part is getting accustomed to what software packages in Linux are equivalent to what in Windows (like knowing GIMP is basically Photoshop).

          1 of 1 people found this helpful
            • gramps28

              I'm with Smply on this.

               

              I've built computers and when I didn't want to buy Windows I would put a version of Linux on them

              but 15 years ago byt they had 3rd party software limitations not sure about now.

               

              Now my use is more like Smply's and the main thing I look for is if the OS is limited to the browser you can use,

               

              I had a MS Surface RT and I couldn't install Firefox on it and I have no use for a Chromebook since I don't like Chrome

              which is why I'm sticking with Windows 10.

              1 of 1 people found this helpful
                • endeavour1701

                  gramps28 wrote:

                   

                  I'm with Smply on this.

                   

                  I've built computers and when I didn't want to buy Windows I would put a version of Linux on them

                  but 15 years ago byt they had 3rd party software limitations not sure about now.

                   

                  Now my use is more like Smply's and the main thing I look for is if the OS is limited to the browser you can use,

                   

                  I had a MS Surface RT and I couldn't install Firefox on it and I have no use for a Chromebook since I don't like Chrome

                  which is why I'm sticking with Windows 10.

                  When you purchase a Surface RT, you know that you can install apps from the WIndows Store. So, you check first if FIrefox has an app in that store. So if you are dealing with computers since a while, you should had known that...

                  Chromebook, I hate it, because it's all in the cloud.

                   

                  I personally have a Surface Pro 3. If I had the money, I would definitely upgrade it to the most recent model. It still works perfectly, and I really like it. Runs WIndows 10.

                • dc5fan

                  Thanks for your reply. I am in my mid-60's. I was never a gamer, but my forte was, and still is, music! From the late 50's to mid 70's I listen to rock, country, and easy listening (especially instrumentals). When my wife and had about 700+ vinyl LPs about half of them were mine. I was able to take the LPs with a Technics turntable and use a Philips CD Audio Recorder I could record my own CDs. Using an old Roxio software I changed the CDs to mp3s. I have access to a computer (Windows 7 PRO), and a laptop (using now). The only TV I watch is Hallmark Channel, MeTV, and Fox News. I just consider myself as "a simple man". Oh, I forgot, I do hang around here perhaps too much. LOL!

                • drnewcomb2

                  I use all three: OSX, Windows & Linux. It really depends on what you want to do. If you play a lot of PC games where you need a close integration between the program and the graphics card, you probably want to stick with Windows. Through a package called "Wine" Linux has a lot of compatibility with Windows and can run a lot of Windows programs. There are also Linux counterparts to a lot of Windows applications (sort of like iOS vs Android)

                   

                  My suggestion is that you look for a local LUG (Linux Users Group) and attend a meeting or two.

                  1 of 1 people found this helpful
                  • endeavour1701

                    I started using Linux with a friend installing a Debian on my computer (dual boot), was at the time of Windows XP.

                    Was hard to install, because you had to know what driver to install. Not that easy.

                     

                    Then, Ubuntu came around. Was awesome. Was discovering your hardware automatically.

                    Just to say, you have distribution, like Debian, that are a source of many other distribution. Ubuntu is based on Debian.

                     

                    I quit Ubuntu now because of one reason, they implemented a store, and start selling stuff. Like an AppStore or WIndows Store.

                    Plus, their new interface Unity is awful.

                    Debian became so easy to install today that I am going with it.

                     

                    I really like Debian because everything is a package, easy to install and uninstall. It's clean. THe update, one command line.

                     

                    You can choose having thr KDE interface (closest to Windows I would say) and and Gnome. I prefer Gnome. But you can have both installed and switch between them.

                     

                     

                    As said, it all depends what you are doing.

                     

                    I used to work exclusively on Ubuntu, and I had a Virtual Machine in order to run some Microsoft specific program.

                    Even if you were using WIne (which emulates a C drive and a registry), you couldn't install Microsoft Office. The problem was the license/activation.

                     

                    But I recommend a dual boot with a Windows.

                     

                    As said, you will have better compatibility with a Windows installed if you wants to use the graphics capability.

                     

                    Enjoy your journey to Linux....