Is the 600mhz LTE always going to be slow?

emeraldsquid

    I'm in the process of switching from Verizon right now, but I wanted to make sure that your LTE Band 71 (600MHz) would work in my area first (I live outside Shingletown, CA). I purchased a Samsung J3 Star that will have the sole function as a tethered modem. My primary purpose in switching to T-Mobile was to be able to drop my Frontier DSL. I was averaging about 3Mbps down and 2Mbps up (which is pretty pathetic) till I hit 50GB. Now my speeds have dropped to unusable. Is this what I can expect from T-Mobile?

     

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      All replies

      • snn555

        Re: Is the 600mhz LTE always going to be slow?

        Depends on which plan you are on as some plans have a Max tethering speed of 3g. Also that particular phone has a less-than-desirable modem set in it which is not optimized for fast speeds even on LTE.  Also unless I'm incorrect band 71 is really built for range and penetration.

         

        So you may have several factors in play affecting your speed.

        • emeraldsquid

          I've payed for the tethering upgrade, however that seems unrelated as tests directly from the phone are no different from the tether. I'm not all that concerned if I'm getting less than optimal LTE speeds, I'd settle for usable speeds. Speeds better than rural DSL. Running tests down in town with this phone got 21Mbps down and 6Mbps up. I would be ecstatic for half that. Last night after midnight I was able to get 3Mbps and 2Mbps. Still worse than my DSL on the DL side, but at least usable. This morning:

           

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          This is pathetic.

            • drnewcomb2

              Running tests down in town with this phone got 21Mbps down and 6Mbps up.

               

              I think you've answered my question. Do you have a different location where you can run those speed tests? Like an upstairs window. It sounds to me like the uplink is weak. If you can get a better line of sight back to the tower it might help.

            • emeraldsquid

              No, that is from an upstairs window and as of 9:30 this morning my internet access completely dropped off. Once you're over 50GB are you supposed to be cut off during peak hours?

              • emeraldsquid

                I've got a wife and four kids who are out of school for the summer. Between her facebooking and multiple streams of Netflix/Youtube running data is easily devoured. Before we hit the 50GB mark, they had the 3Mbps we were getting pegged non-stop.

                • emeraldsquid

                  There isn't a higher tier plan and by deprioritized, do you mean completely cut off? Is 3Mbps down the best that can be expected from LTE Band 71? From what you're telling me, I should cut my losses with the restocking fee and stay with Verizon.

                    • drnewcomb2

                      Probably a good idea. The issue is that you're trying to do what T-Mobile has tried to wire their plans to prevent people doing: using their mobile phones as a replacement for an ISP.

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                        • emeraldsquid

                          How has T-Mobile hard wired their plan to prevent people from using their phone as an ISP when I literally bought a plan to allow me to tether my phone for unlimited data? Are you really going to tell me that unlimited data means that once I hit 50GB my phone is completely without data during the day? The point is moot now. I'm pissed off that I payed $40 for 50GB of data, but at least I was able to cut my losses early.

                            • drnewcomb2

                              The whole "deprioritization" policy came about several years ago after T-Mobile realized that some people were using their unlimited mobile data as a wireless ISP.  In some cases people were setting up apartment building WiFi networks and selling access to their neighbors, using terabytes of data per month. "Deprioritization" was developed specifically to prevent this. So, in reality, when deprioritization strikes, it's usually somewhat harsher than one might believe because anyone who wants access gets it before you do.

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