Very bad coverage in North Georgia

bluesbey

    Recently my wife and I were on vacation in North Georgia in the Helen, Cleveland, and Dahlonega area. T-mobile coverage was simply awful. I couldn't even make phone calls in several places much less use any data. This made it impossible to count on T-mobile while hiking in the area. In Dahlonega, home of Univ. of North Georgia, I got no service at all while outside a restaurant on Memorial Ave. But, on the T-mobile coverage map it reports "excellent signal" in that very area. Nothing could be further from the truth. How can this be "verified by customer data" if you have no way of tracking how many customers don't get connected when they try? I had a similar experience in the area around Newnan, Georgia back in Marcch. Again, T-mobile reports coverage where there is NONE. Meanwhile, my wife is using Airvoiceless Wireless on the ATT network and she got coverage all through north Georgia, and with data. We both have the same model phone: Nokia 2 running Android 7.0.1. I find it very disconcerting that T-mobile's coverage maps are so inaccurate, and over-report coverage. This makes it very difficult to plan for trips, and using things like Google Maps is utterly unreliable. So, T-mobile support folks, how are customers to report bad coverage ? Do you have a mechanism for that? (I couldn't find any obvious way to do this other than writing this forum). Does that feedback go back into your coverage map? How can customers be assured that they are getting accurate information when they reference your maps? Just so you know, based on my experience, if customers want reliable service in the rural areas of North Georgia they would be better served using ATT or Verizon. Sorry to have to say that because I'm no fan of either.

      All replies

      • magenta5640912

        Re: Very bad coverage in North Georgia

        Pretty much the same all over Georgia If you are not in or around a city.  I don't know what their problem is with Georgia.  I even have a personal cellspot in my house.

        • tmo_amanda

          Re: Very bad coverage in North Georgia

          Hey, bluesbey!

           

          Welcome to our Support Community and thank you for sharing the type of service you're experiencing in GA. I checked out the towers in the area and due to the type of phone you have, you'll only experience 2G around the university. LTE is available in the area but you must have a compatible phone. You can reference this for the type of frequencies available on our network. At the first location (Dahlonega), only bands 2, 12, and 2G are available. The same is true for Helen and Cleveland. If you had a device that supports Band 2 or 12, you'd see a massive improvement in service.

           

          Available devices that include Band 2: Coverage compatible device list | LTE | 1900 Band 2

          Available devices that include Band 12: Extended Range LTE | 600 MHz & 700 MHz Spectrum Phones | T-Mobile

           

          Please let me know if you have any other questions.

            • magenta5640912

              Re: Very bad coverage in North Georgia

              What type of phone do you think I have?   I have a samsung J7.  I also do not live near the places you listed.

               

              Sent from Yahoo Mail on Android

              • bluesbey

                Re: Very bad coverage in North Georgia

                Hi Amanda,

                Thanks for the additional info. I can understand why T-mobile is putting a plug in for the phones that it sells, but the Nokia 2 should still work. Here's why I think so.

                 

                As far as I can determine, T-Mobile reportedly operates on the following bands/frequencies:

                2G Bands: 2 (1900 MHz)

                3G Bands: 2,4

                3G Frequencies: 1900, 1700/2100

                4G LTE Bands: 2, 4, 12, 66,71

                4G LTE Frequencies: 1900, 1700/2100, 700, 600

                 

                The Nokia 2 specs:

                2G bandsGSM 850 / 900 / 1800 / 1900 - SIM 1 & SIM 2 (dual-SIM model only)
                3G bandsHSDPA 850 / 900 / 1900 / 2100
                4G bandsLTE band 1(2100), 3(1800), 5(850), 7(2600), 8(900), 20(800), 28(700), 38(2600), 40(2300)

                4G frequencies: LTE 800, 850, 900, 1800, 2100, 2600

                 

                Looking at these numbers, there should have at least been enough overlap (in bold) to make a phone call in Dahlonega. Can you explain to me why I couldn't even make a phone call in Dahlonega if the T-mobile network supports 2G there?

                What's more, T-mobile coverage maps DO NOT specify which 4G LTE bands/frequencies are available in a given area. It just lists "4G LTE".  Most people would assume "4G LTE" on T-mobile means all the frequencies given above. How would they know any different? Also, contrary to what T-mobile claims about its coverage maps, I could see no indicators for 2G and 3G coverage. The coverage map only gives 4G LTE coverage. The upshot of this lack of information is that the customers have no way to reliably predict where they won't have coverage. This is really unsatisfactory. Don't you agree?

                Did you mean to imply that unless I have a cellphone model that T-mobile sells (Alcatel, Apple, LG, Samsung, and T-mobile), that I can expect less than stellar service?

                I generally like T-mobile, but right now switching carriers looks a lot more appealing to me than buying a T-mobile proprietary phone. Can you give me some good reasons for staying with T-mobile? (Here's an irony: the Nokia 2 is listed on Amazon as T-mobile compatible!)

              • drnewcomb2

                Re: Very bad coverage in North Georgia

                When we were hiking the southern AT in N. GA, the shuttle driver let us know that the only carrier with decent coverage in that area was Verizon. So, if you're in Suches, it's Verizon of nothing. This is one reason I keep an old CDMA flip-phone active on PagePlus PAYG service. I have been rather impressed with the fact that I could use my T-Mobile phone at the Hike Inn (standing at one particular spot outside).

                 

                Verizon and AT&T (the duopoly) built their coverage by buying up smaller cellular companies that specialized in covering rural areas. This involved working with mixed technologies (e.g. analog, CDMA, TDMA, GSM). T-Mobile developed by building and all-GSM PCS network and never even owned a low-band cellular license until fairly recently. Different approaches, each with advantages and disadvantages. In recent years T-Mobile has been building their rural network at a furious pace but still has some way to go catching up with the duopoly's 20-year head-start.

                  • bluesbey

                    Re: Very bad coverage in North Georgia

                    If T-mobile wants to have at least a minimum of service in all rural areas then it should really try to have reliable 2G service everywhere. It doesn't. My phone couldn't pick up any service in Dahlonega, and only one bar sometimes in Cleveland. I hate the duopoly that ATT & Verizon have, and prefer T-mobile. But, at the end of the day you've got to have reliable phone coverage. Before your hiking trip was there any reliable way for you to know that you wouldn't have coverage? Finding that out on a shuttle bus is a bit late. T-mobile really needs to let its customers know what frequencies are available where for the whole continuum from 2G to 5G. I don't want to be driving on a rural highway somewhere and have my phone service not work unexpectedly. That did happen to us near Carrolton GA, and providentially my wife's phone carrier was Airvoice Wirelss that uses the ATT frequencies. We were able to call AAA and get roadside service. According to Amanda, there should have been at least 2G service in North Georgia. Where did she get that information? Is there any way to tell where T-mobile 2G is available?

                      • magenta5640912

                        Re: Very bad coverage in North Georgia

                        On highway 27 between Carrollton and Lagrange there is no coverage for most of that road, I travel it quite a bit.  This is a major 4 lane highway.  Also from South of Macon to Florida in the rural areas there is very little coverage unless you are on the interstate.  I used to travel the whole state with my work and it was frustrating to not have coverage in the rural areas and the small towns.  Much of south Georgia is farm land but there some major highways through the area.  I threatened several times to go to Dollar General and purchase a prepay phone.  It has been a couple of years since I had to quit working due to health and I think there has been some improvement between Columbus and Albany and Albany to interstate 75.

                         

                        Sent from Yahoo Mail on Android

                         

                          On Fri, Jul 27, 2018 at 4:17 PM, bluesbey<no-reply@t-mobile.com> wrote:  

                        #yiv6564249919 * #yiv6564249919 a #yiv6564249919 body {font-family:Helvetica, Arial, sans-serif;}#yiv6564249919 #yiv6564249919 h1, #yiv6564249919 h2, #yiv6564249919 h3, #yiv6564249919 h4, #yiv6564249919 h5, #yiv6564249919 h6, #yiv6564249919 p, #yiv6564249919 hr {}#yiv6564249919 .yiv6564249919button td {}

                        |

                         

                        T-Mobile Support

                         

                         

                        |

                         

                         

                        |

                        Very bad coverage in North Georgia

                         

                        reply from bluesbey in Network & coverage - View the full discussion

                         

                        If T-mobile wants to at least a minimum of service in all rural areas then it should really try to have reliable 2G service everywhere. It doesn't. My phone couldn't pick up any service in Dahlonega, and only one bar sometimes in Cleveland. I hate the duopoly that ATT & Verizon have, and prefer T-mobile. But, at the end of the day you've got to have reliable phone coverage. Before your hiking trip was there any reliable way for you to know that you wouldn't have coverage? Finding that out on a shuttle bus is a bit late. T-mobile really needs to let its customers know what frequencies are available where for the whole continuum from 2G to 5G. I don't want to be driving on a rural highway somewhere and have my phone service not work unexpectedly. That did happen to us near Carrolton GA, and providentially my wife's phone carrier was Airvoice Wirelss that uses the ATT frequencies. We were able to call AAA and get roadside service. According to Amanda, there should have been at least 2G service in North Georgia. Where did she get that information? Is there any way to tell where T-mobile 2G is available?

                         

                        Reply to this message by replying to this email, or go to the message on T-Mobile Support

                        Start a new discussion in Network & coverage by email or at T-Mobile Support

                        Following Very bad coverage in North Georgia in these streams: Inbox

                         

                         

                        This email was sent by T-Mobile Support because you are a registered user.

                        You may unsubscribe instantly from T-Mobile Support, or adjust email frequency in your email preferences

                          |

                        • drnewcomb2

                          Re: Very bad coverage in North Georgia

                          bluesbey wrote:

                           

                          If T-mobile wants to have at least a minimum of service in all rural areas then it should really try to have reliable 2G service everywhere. It doesn't. My phone couldn't pick up any service in Dahlonega, and only one bar sometimes in Cleveland. I hate the duopoly that ATT & Verizon have, and prefer T-mobile. But, at the end of the day you've got to have reliable phone coverage. Before your hiking trip was there any reliable way for you to know that you wouldn't have coverage? Finding that out on a shuttle bus is a bit late. T-mobile really needs to let its customers know what frequencies are available where for the whole continuum from 2G to 5G. I don't want to be driving on a rural highway somewhere and have my phone service not work unexpectedly. That did happen to us near Carrolton GA, and providentially my wife's phone carrier was Airvoice Wirelss that uses the ATT frequencies. We were able to call AAA and get roadside service. According to Amanda, there should have been at least 2G service in North Georgia. Where did she get that information? Is there any way to tell where T-mobile 2G is available?

                           

                          Well, 2G service is on the way out. In some markets (e.g. NYC) T-Mobile has reduced GSM 2G to just about nothing, converting the spectrum to the much more efficient LTE. T-Mobile's longest-range spectrum (600 & 700 MHz) isn't even standardized for 2G. There are two places you can go to find what bands T-Mobile has deployed in different areas. The first is a version of T-Mobile's Personal Coverage Check . The other is crowd-sourced: www.cellmapper.net. On CellMapper it helps to know that T-Mobile's MNC is 310260. If you click on the towers in Dahlonega, you'll see my handle associated with them because of the signal mapping I've done on various trips.