JOD - Required condition of returned phone without insurance coverage?

whatmeworry

    Suppose I get a phone and decide to switch to another via JOD.  What must be the condition of the phone I'm returning?  Assume that I do not purchase an insurance plan.  Will it be accepted with scuffs on the case?  How about scratches on the screen?  What about a cracked screen?

     

    I saw some small print about possible charges for damaged phones but the range was broad (something like $40 to $200+).  How can I find specific information on this?

     

    Also, is there any benefit to purchasing the phone outright instead of via JOD?  It looks like the price is the same either way and if I keep the phone for the full 24 months then I will own it anyway.

     

    Thanks.

      All replies

      • artart

        whatmeworry wrote:

         

        #1 Suppose I get a phone and decide to switch to another via JOD. What must be the condition of the phone I'm returning? Assume that I do not purchase an insurance plan. Will it be accepted with scuffs on the case? How about scratches on the screen? What about a cracked screen?

         

        #2 I saw some small print about possible charges for damaged phones but the range was broad (something like $40 to $200+). How can I find specific information on this?

         

        #3 Also, is there any benefit to purchasing the phone outright instead of via JOD? It looks like the price is the same either way and if I keep the phone for the full 24 months then I will own it anyway.

         

        Thanks.

        Hi whatmeworry

        Welcome to the forum.

         

        #1 Supposedly minor signs of everyday use are  acceptable. Of course a good case and screen protection would assure compliance with that requirement. Cracked glass and other major damages are another matter.

         

        Here is some info if you already haven't seen it.

        Excess wear

        If you return a device to T-Mobile that exhibits excess wear and use, you'll be charged for that item. Excess wear and use is beyond the minor wear reasonably expected to result from ordinary, everyday use, such as a cracked or otherwise damaged display; damage caused by exposure to liquid; failure to properly power on; material alterations to its hardware or software; or failure to remove or disable any anti-theft or similar features from an item, such as Find My iPhone.

         

        #2 I don't think there can be a definitive answer to that. I know this. If I owned a phone and wanted to pay to repair it myself or even do some minor cosmetic repairs myself, I can have some control over what I pay and how good a repair job would be acceptable. If I had to, I could even use a phone with a slightly cracked screen for quite a while. When it comes to turning  in a lease, be it a phone or leased car, we are at the mercy of the lessor. We have to pay whatever we are told to pay. For that reason I would either be prepared to pay whatever might be asked, or buy insurance.

         

        #3 There doesn't seem to be any clear cut benefit to EIP.  JOD offers some more flexibility.  The draw back to JOD, could be a constant temptation to upgrade and pay additional money in order to upgrade.

         

        I might not have the exact  answers your were seeking, but I hope my opinions might be of some help.

         

        Art

        2 of 2 people found this helpful
          • whatmeworry

            Hi Art,

             

            Thank you for your reply.  I had seen the disclaimer about returning a damaged device but couldn't find info on actual costs in such a case.  I assumed that there would be costs because obviously T-Mobile wants to sell insurance.  I just found this article; it's two years old but maybe the info still stands; it claims damage fees of $250 each for damages of (1) cracked screen, (2) liquid damage, and (3) device does not power on; thus the total fee could be as high as $750 (for a device that has all three attributes).  The solution there is to just pay the balance on the phone to own the broken device instead of returning it.

             

            http://www.tmonews.com/2015/06/everything-you-need-to-know-about-t-mobiles-new-jump-on-demand-lease-program

             

            Damage Fees

            Whenever you return a leased device – whether it’s at the end of your term or to upgrade – T-Mobile staff will check it for damage. They look for three key things: Cracked Screens, Liquid Damage and whether the phone powers on. If your leased phone fails to pass these three criteria, you’ll be fined. Each of the three criteria carries a fine of $250.

            • Cracked Screen Damage fee – $250
            • Liquid Damage fee – $250
            • Device does not power on fee – $250

            In the terms given to staff it states the following: “If there is damage(s) to the leased device, customers will be responsible for the SUM of the assessed damage fees.”

            If you decide to pay the damage fees when you return the device, you don’t get to keep the device even if what you pay exceeds the Purchase Option Price (detailed below). So, if it’s going to cost you more to return it, it’s worth considering paying to own the damaged device.

            I guess that since I'm looking for fairly inexpensive phones anyway, I should just assume that "if I break it I own it" :-)

             

            Again, thank you for your insight on this.

             

            Ken

            1 of 1 people found this helpful
            • imvuuu

              hi, how about the accessories that came with the phone? do we have to turn those in along with the phone?