Why would a T-Mobile store sell me a 2 year old phone?

ski11x

    Recently my HTC phone had an unexpected failure, so I took a trip to my local store to get a new phone and upgrade my plan.  Of course they were out of the S7 and S7 Edge, so the sales person recommended the J7.  I had read about this phone and figured it would do just fine for what I needed, and the cost was way cheaper than the S7.  I completed the deal, but they didn't have any screen protectors or cases on hand so I went home and turned to Amazon to get some accessories.  The date and info on the box was 05/10/2017, SM-J700T. Seems like it's a pretty new phone, but nothing that I ordered fit properly.  After finding some visuals on earlier variants, I discovered this is a 2015, not a 2017 and the current version that I was led to believe.  So after spending an extra $50 to dress up the phone, I had to return it all and purchase for a 2015 model.

     

    Why would they do this?  Is it me or was I mis-led by the salesperson in thinking I was buying the most current version?

      All replies

      • theartiszan

        Not sure what you mean about most current variant. There was only one j7 released which came out in 2015. There hasn't been a newer version of the same model number.

        This is one of few mid range devices the are sold so there aren't new versions all that often.

        • stevetjr

          There are a few differences in the original SM-J700 versus the SM-J700T which is specific to T-Mobile (There is a 700P for Virgin/Boost).  The original J7 released in 2015 only had 1.5GB ram and didn't support some of TMO's frequencies.  The J700T has 2GB ram and also supports all of TMO's current frequencies including Band 12.  Also the original J7 was had Android 5.1 Lollipop, the J700T launched with MM.  T-Mobile didn't start selling the the 700T until June of last year (2016) so this version and for TMO it is almost a year old.  My son has one and it works great for a "mid" range phone, better than most the options at that price point.