danialejo

    Thus far samsung galaxy s6 edge and s6 have recieved the update for the international version and Korea, not t mobile in Poland has released it to its users, but here in the US there's no sing that they even have the software and are currently testing it, which it's ridiculous seen that the same company has already pushed it in another country, how much longer should we have to wait, knowing that it's been released for testing and it's been tested and approved in other markets?

      All replies

      • tidbits

        This has beaten with a dead horse on more than one occasion.

        • tmo_mike_c

          Hey danialejo and thanks for post.

           

          We get this question very often for this phone as well as others. As of right now, we don't have a specific time that we can give you. The most reliable source we have for our customers is our dedicated Software updates page. It'll be the best source for the status of Marshmallow.

            • mellovesbrandon

              to be honest that page doesn't tell us anything about updates for the Samsung devices. It's been saying the update is in manufacturer development and hasn't moved in months. If you have the software and are working on adding your apps to it and testing it, then just tell us and we'll stop complaining. Also where is our security updates for January and February? I haven't seen one for this dev since the one back in December

                • theartiszan

                  That means that samsung is still working on it and hadn't given it to tmobile yet.

                  After tmobile gets it,  the status will change to something like tmobile testing

                    • ctb206@gmail.com

                      It sounds like you're offloading all of the responsibility to Samsung, even for T-Mobile's proprietary software.  That is really hard to believe.  T-Mobile has agreements in place with Samsung around this process and if the agreements don't serve T-Mobile well, then T-Mobile should address those agreements with Samsung.  And while you can come back with "well, it's true, whether it's hard to believe or not", another truth is that in the court of public opinion T-Mobile USA is the one lagging here, simply because Samsung is delivering the goods for other variants.

                       

                      Again, if T-Mobile is taking undue criticism because of Samsung's lack of action, T-Mobile should address the issue with Samsung, and report a status update to its customers.

                       

                      Unfortunately for T-Mobile, the more you offload responsibility to Samsung, and the longer T-Mobile goes without openly addressing the issue, the worse T-Mobile looks in my eyes.  And subsequently, the longer this goes on, the more likely I'll be to buy an international/unlocked variant next time, sacrificing the 1700 3G band and WiFi calling.  Considering that T-Mobile's WiFi calling is turned off on my phone due to dozens of dropped calls while using it, I'm justifiably much less concerned about T-Mobile's arguably useless proprietary features than I am about receiving a universally faster, more energy efficient, and more stable, operating system update.

                       

                      T-Mobile might want to note that this lack of Marshmallow update is not acting as a reason for me to buy a new Galaxy S7 from T-Mobile.  Rather it is acting as a reason for me to buy a new phone from somewhere other than T-Mobile as an effort to get away from T-Mobile one step at a time.

                       

                      All this is to say that in the opinion of this consumer it would behoove T-Mobile to take some responsibility for its services and provisions.  There is something to be said for a company that's willing to say proactively, "We're sorry, we understand we've let you down, we're working on it, and we'll keep you updated regularly".  It's not that hard actually.

                        • tidbits

                          Manufacturers already ADMITTED they do all the software coding on their devices. T-Mobile gives them the code in advance. Manufacturers also charge carriers for the work on these devices for the addition. They've said this multiple times yet no one listens. Yet people across the pond heard this and changed who they blame. Look how much faster they get updates... Go figure.

                          • tidbits

                            Already been proven in court carriers make almost nothing when people upgrade their phones to newer devices. Even manufacturers attested to it in the same court cases. It's actually more cost effective to stick you to a single device for multiple years. However that's bad for manufacturers as people are not buying their products.

                              • ctb206@gmail.com

                                Well, since T-Mobile seems content to allow you to be its spokesman, I'll take your word as T-Mobile's.

                                 

                                It's interesting that, everywhere else in the retail world, when a consumer buys a product and that product isn't upholding its expectations then the issue is addressed with the consumer by the retailer - not by the manufacturer.  It's interesting to note that even in the car industry, one in which the retailer is arguably at the mercy of the manufacturer more so than in any other industry, the privately owned dealership takes responsibility and own the relationship with the customer.

                                 

                                Since T-Mobile is content existing at the mercy of its handset suppliers, and isn't interested in owning the relationship with its customers on this board, I've decided to buy my next phone from somewhere other than T-Mobile.  It sounds like both T-mobile and I will both be happier that way.  (Bolded in hopes that someone from T-Mobile sees this.)

                                 

                                Although it does make one wonder... if T-Mobile doesn't make any money from selling phones, and experiences greater profits when consumers buy phones elsewhere, as you say is the case, then why has T-Mobile built out the infrastructure of so many stores and employees?  Why does T-Mobile run so many expensive ads to showcase these phones that they don't make any money selling?  Why doesn't T-Mobile spend all that money investing in it's cellular towers and frequencies if order to provide better service in order to attract consumers to the part of its business that is actually profitable?  Why did it give away the farm in order to have the privilege of selling the iPhone so many years back?  Consumers could have just bought a carrier unlocked iPhone from Apple and popped a T-Mobile SIM in the phone (as many did).  Doesn't all of this behavior indicate that selling phones really is profitable for carriers? 

                                 

                                In big business there can be only one reason why carriers sell phones: profits.  One way or another, it's profitable for carriers to sell phones.  If it weren't profitable, it would be viewed as an enormous financial liability by these enormous and sophisticated businesses.  The cost center would have to be disbanded and an alternative retail model would emerge.  In fact, that is an obligation that the carriers would have to execute on behalf of their shareholders

                                 

                                Also, I'm just curious, are you an employee of T-Mobile?  I don't mean any disrespect, but it seems odd to me that your profile is so boldly noted as a "Pillar of the Community", yet in this instance, when the company's and the community's interests are in conflict, you are clearly advocating on behalf of the company rather than the community.

                                  • tidbits

                                    No I do not work for T-Mobile.  I spend a lot of time here and help a lot of people as to why I got the title.  It has nothing to do with employment.

                                     

                                    With that said...  It was testified in court and various documents were submitted and the manufacturers also testified to that fact.  This is the reason why the courts ruled ETF justifiable and that the ETF also had to have diminishing returns.  They have never made profit off the phones.  Much like consoles manufacturers they never make money off the consoles.  They make money off the licensing of trademark and DRM(carriers do this by contract).  Buy that game Sony makes $15 out of the $60 you pay now multiply that buy 10,000,000.  Selling phones is an evil they have to do if you really think about it.  Not eveyone is tech savvy know where to go to get phones etc etc.  A lot of people took the subsidy to get said iPhone.  The unlocked iPhone is the least sold iphone as attested to the fact all carriers buy into Apple and Apple has so much control.  If Apple could just sell unlocked and through them only why would Apple make deals with the carriers? 

                                     

                                    Haven't you wondered... If manufacturers were being stopped or delayed by carriers for updates why don't they say they are?  They don't because they like the fact carriers buy into their programs and lowest the  amount of devices they have to sell to turn a profit.  Better to sell 3,000,000 units to turn a profit than to sell 5,000,000.  Now how much profit do you think they made if they sold 10,000,000 units and either scenario they made $200 per device?  All these manufacturers could simply pull an Apple, or Google.  The technology is there, but they don't because of above.  They know people like you will always blame the carrier.

                                      • e2k

                                        More people are excited by the prospect of a new device rather than a carrier's plan. In order to attract customers, carriers must sell phones.

                                         

                                        Imagine a T-Mobile and a Verizon store located adjacent to each other. The Verizon store has many phones on display (like most other stores). Meanwhile, the T-Mobile store is just a small office with no phones on display, and can only activate service for you. The T-Mobile store offers services at a 25% discount over Verizon. Notwithstanding the discount, which store do you think people will go into, and ultimately buy their service from?

                                      • tmo_mike_c

                                        Let me help clear things up so we don’t go too far off the rails here. The status page I posted earlier in this thread will have the latest information we can give about software updates. It’s a joint effort between manufacturers and T-Mobile, so we’re not trying to play the “Blame Game” on when the software is available for release. There are many factors that go in to the release of updates which are reflected on the update page as we’re told. The software page is there to give folks a brief status update for the Marshmallow release. Since we’re not involved with the software release in other countries, we won’t be able to use that as a reference for our version.  Based on what we know right now, the S6 will be getting Marshmallow.

                                          • boomtastic

                                            Obviously the status page is terrible or else we wouldn't be having this conversation. When we contact Samsung they say the delay is on T-Mobile. T-Mobile says the delay is on Samsung. Google already released the core code months ago so we know it's available. We don't know who to believe at this point because it looks like a lot of confusion and finger pointing...

                                              • tidbits

                                                boomtastic wrote:

                                                 

                                                Obviously the status page is terrible or else we wouldn't be having this conversation. When we contact Samsung they say the delay is on T-Mobile. T-Mobile says the delay is on Samsung. Google already released the core code months ago so we know it's available. We don't know who to believe at this point because it looks like a lot of confusion and finger pointing...

                                                Get someone from Samsung front office to say it's T-Mobile.  Low level reps from Samsung WILL NOT know.  They will say whatever to get you off the phone BECAUSE they can't answer the question and they know this is the fastest way to get you off the phone.  They NEVER give out anything factual and never put their names on it.  If it is true why doesn't Samsung put their name on it and back their product?

                                                • e2k

                                                  boomtastic wrote:

                                                   

                                                  Obviously the status page is terrible or else we wouldn't be having this conversation. When we contact Samsung they say the delay is on T-Mobile. T-Mobile says the delay is on Samsung. Google already released the core code months ago so we know it's available. We don't know who to believe at this point because it looks like a lot of confusion and finger pointing...

                                                   

                                                  Actually, the status page is quite useful. As tidbits has explained many times, the carrier must sign an NDA when contracting with the manufacturer to develop an update. The Software updates page reflects the most recent information that is available for public disclosure. I realize that many people are dissatisfied with it, but it is the only information that TMO can pass on to its customers.

                                                   

                                                  I find the whole update process to be frustrating as well. I just realize that the best way for me to make my voice heard is to vote with my wallet. Hence, I do not plan to buy any more carrier branded phones. The next phone I buy will be a Nexus. This cuts both the carriers and the manufacturers out of the picture. No more rumors, fingerpointing or accusations about the update process, along with no more carrier bloatware... just pure android. Sounds like a good deal to me.

                                                  • stevetjr

                                                    ctb206@gmail.com you say you will go to a different carrier for an update?? If you were with one of the other 3 would you be saying the same thing since no carrier in the US has Marshmallow for the S6/S6e/S6e+ yet.  While he update page is pretty basic it is more than the other carriers show and is an improvement from the past where you had to wonder if your device was getting the next update or not at all. Samsung has missed 2 of their own dates with this release if you go by the numerous leaked documents with release schedules as have some of the other manufacturers that have had their release schedules slide.  HTC which has their update "promise" even had to push theirs back because they stated they were having unexpected issues with Marshmallow.  Your analogy with cars is Apple and Oranges since if your car has an issue and the dealer has to do something with it they get paid to do it by "Chevy" or whomever even if it is a software update for your car. If their is no service bulletin or TSB for your problem your dealer will charge you for the repair. More accurate is say Best Buy, if you buy a Sony TV and after the return period you don't have one of Best Buy's service plans they will refer you to Sony.  Sure I have seen retailers if it is something not to expensive same with car dealers do something to make it right but that is at their loss just to keep you as a loyal customer but that doesn't work here because T-Mobile has no control over it until they get the software to test.  I can tell you from being a T-Mobile customer for well over a century through good times and bad that their turn around from testing to release once they get the software has dramatically improved over the last couple of years.  Lastly like tidbits no I don't nor have ever worked for T-Mobile but rather have been on this user supported help forum like a few others that enjoy helping folks with solvable problems.  While it may seem we "take" T-Mobile's side on this it is probably more the frustration of going thru this every year with the "major" update that is out and having folks get so upset about an update especially in this case that isn't available to any carrier in the US yet or a couple of years ago when everyone was clamoring for the update which Sprint and Verizon phones got first, AT&T next (but they pulled it shortly thereafter) that was bricking everyone's phone which T-Mobile had caught in testing so when Samsung fixed the update T-Mobile ended up first with the update that didn't brick phones but no one gives them credit for that. 

                                                     

                                                    mellovesbrandon as e2k pointed out that the GS6 & GS7 are different hardware most notably the processor which was a Samsung Exynos in the GS6 - Note 5 era and they have now gone back to Qualcomm for the GS7.  The T-Mobile Apps are not really where the issue is I suspect as Apps don't really have to be programmed by the manufacturer just put in root folders so they can't be deleted. The issue with US carrier phones and especially with T-Mobile is the "features" that T-Mobile's network supports that the other carriers don't and while the other carriers may have one or two of the same features as T-Mobile they don't have all of them together and they all have relation to each other in some sense so the code has to be tied together and they have to be tested individually but also together.  These features like Wi-Fi calling, GoGo texting, RCS (Advanced Messaging) VoLTE all have to integrated at an OS level for security because they have access to the restricted "sandboxed" part of the SIM and OS something Apps will never have access to. This requires Samsung to have to custom program all this stuff.  Now as some of these features become common place then most likely Android will just include said code natively in to the AOSP version of Android and then Samsung won't have to go add it to their "custom" version of Android.

                                            • tidbits

                                              Do you honestly believe manufacturers are simple going to hand out their proprietary code to carriers?

                                              • theartiszan

                                                With the s7 being out though that shows that the code from tmobile side is done.  WiFi calling has even been open source for a while. All of tmobile applications are compatible and even have been working with the nexus 6 for a while. It isn't that tmobile hasn't provided their applications.  Samsung needs to build all that in and they haven't finished yet.  And if I'm not mistaken,  none of the us based s6 variants have it yet. So that does shed light that Samsung hasn't pushed to the states. Plus here there are a lot more certifications the software will need to pass first before tmobile can test it too. This has been discussed multiple times and Google among others have stated it isn't the carrier that is holding things up but the manufacturers.

                                        • mellovesbrandon

                                          what I don't understand is why if marshmallow works on the new s7/s7 edge with tmobile apps then why can't they release it for USA  galaxy devices

                                            • tidbits

                                              Because Samsung used 100+ developers specifically for the S7 and Edge. It happens with all manufacturers. Put as much resources you can in the newest product and as little as you can for products that no longer generate money.

                                                • e2k

                                                  tidbits wrote:


                                                  Put as much resources you can in the newest product and as little as you can for products that no longer generate money.

                                                   

                                                   

                                                  Bingo!

                                                   

                                                  How much money will Samsung make selling the S7/S7 edge? I don't know, but it's a lot of money.

                                                   

                                                  How much money will Samsung make developing a firmware update for the S6 (which the carrier must pay for)? I don't know, but it's a lot less than they make by selling new devices.

                                                    • boomtastic

                                                      Each piece of the industry needs the next in order to profit, so continuing to update their product benefits everyone. Yes, there will always be people that run out and get a new phone as soon as it is released, but there are others that stay with their current phone for a while. Improvements to these phones keep customer retention, which in turn keeps your customer on the same carrier and builds brand loyalty. When the phone finally becomes obsolete, that's when hopefully the carrier has done their best to keep the customer satisfied so they stay.

                                                       

                                                      So yes, Samsung probably doesn't make any money in the form of a pure sales profit off of the older devices, but others do like the carriers when the phones are still in use. For instance the S3 and S4 are still being sold today, and are used on the T-Mobile network. You can bet that Samsung is making money somehow from this through licensing, warranties.and such.

                                                  • e2k

                                                    The S6 and the S7 have different hardware. If Android devices all supported the same software, manufacturers would not have to customize Android in order to work with each model of phone that they sell.

                                                     

                                                    Alas, the firmware for the S7 would never work on the S6.

                                                     

                                                    It's really no different with the iPhone. People think that iPhones use the same firmware across different models, but they don't. Apple just releases new versions of iOS at the same time to make the process smoother. But in reality, iOS 9.x for the iPhone 6 and the iPhone 6s are not the same.