15 Years....

clance

    ....with Verizon and not one security incident. Four months with T-Mobile and my personal information gets hacked. Very Disappointing!

      • smplyunprdctble

        Re: 15 Years....

        It was Experian, not T-Mobile that got hacked.

        It could have been any company that uses Experian.

          • clance

            Re: 15 Years....

            I understand that, but it doesn't change my statement. Final responsibility falls on the people I pay money to, it's up to T-Mobile to protect their customers, names, addresses and ESPECIALLY social security number. Did all of Experian's customers get hacked?

              • smplyunprdctble

                Re: 15 Years....

                and none of the people who use Experian have access to their servers.

                 

                The hackers happened to find the server housing T-Mobile data.  They could have easily happened to find Verizon's data. Or Home Depot's data.  Or Macy's. Or Chase's.

                 

                What happened is the physical equivalent of breaking into a building (Iron Mountain?) and taking a file cabinet.  It was all they could get in the time they were in.  It just HAPPENED to be T-Mobile's data compromised.

                 

                Because it was Experian that was hacked, T-Mobile couldn't have done anything to beef up security to prevent it.  If Suntrust's vault is broken into and Coca Cola's secret recipe is stolen (it could have just as easily been KFC's recipe...), do you blame Coke because they bank that happened to get broken in to, or do you blame Suntrust because they should have the appropriate measures in place to keep things like that from happening?

                  • clance

                    Re: 15 Years....

                    Nothing you've said negates my original statement... I've had email since 1985 when the Internet was mostly text and I used Lynx to get around, I know how this business works. T-Mobile must accept some responsibility and reading the CEO's statement confirms this. Quote: "we will institute a thorough review of our relationship with Experian,"

                     

                    Being notified by Experian via snail mail a month later and never getting an email notice from T-Mobile is also is less than professional. For all I know T-Mobile was paying for a less secure account, trying to get by

                    There's not enough disclosure here. T-Mobile customers whose data was breached should be notified directly by T-Mobile.

                     

                    My original statement stands on it's own and needs no defense or justification.