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HTC/T-mobile 3g operating frequencies

Can anyone please advise what are HTC/T-mobile 3g operating frequencies in the US, the phone is listed as 1700/2100 and I see other new phones with the same, but I have Nokia 5230 Nuron from T-mobile which I think had a diferent ones. Also when trying to use a phone that has 2100 but is not from the T-mobile line, the 3g is not functioning.

Is T-mobile using only 1700? Thank you in advance.

  • 1. Re: HTC/T-mobile 3g operating frequencies

    Radio Frequency Spectrum Bands accessible by T-Mobile USA Customers Using Compatible Devices

     

    Radio frequency spectrum chart

    The following chart describes radio frequency spectrum bands accessible by the company's customers using compatible devices.

    850 MHzGSM/GPRS/EDGE2Gn/a1996Not operated by T-Mobile. Competitor networks accessible via roaming agreements
    1900 MHzGSM/GPRS/EDGE2G19941996Based on original VoiceStream Wireless GSM PCS network
    1700 MHz/2100 MHzUMTS (W-CDMA)/HSPA4G (formerly 3G[31])20062008 (3G), 2010 (Marketed as 4G)First carrier in the U.S. to deploy services on AWSfrequencies. Markets HSPA+ as "4G". UMTS band IV

    On June 28, 2010, the company announced that it will begin to upgrade the network from HSPA+ 21 to HSPA+ 42 beginning sometime in 2011.

  • 2. Re: HTC/T-mobile 3g operating frequencies

    baracuda, thank you for the replay, but I am still not convinced that Tmobile operates at 2100 (or maybe is based on state) I have several phones that have that frequency and they can not use the 3g only the EDGE. I live in Atlanta area, is only 1700 available here? For example ZTE Blade (my UK company phone) has 900/2100 and can not use the tmobile 3g, any ideas please?

  • 3. Re: HTC/T-mobile 3g operating frequencies
    philyew

    TM splits its downstream/upstream services for 3/3.5/4G between 1700 and 2100 mhz. If you have a phone with just 2100 it won't work.

  • 4. Re: HTC/T-mobile 3g operating frequencies

    aaaah, this is what it is, they are splitting...great, thank you! It is a really strange decision by TM, isn't it, in Europe the providers only use one or the other...ok, thanks again philyew.

  • 5. Re: HTC/T-mobile 3g operating frequencies

    That is what the above chart alluded to.  Go into AWS on chart.

     

    The AWS band uses microwave frequencies in two segments: from 1710 to 1755 MHz for uplink, and from 2110 to 2155 MHz for downlink. The service is intended to be used by mobile devices such as wireless phones for mobile data, video, and messaging services.

  • 6. Re: HTC/T-mobile 3g operating frequencies

    So having the 2100 band, that means this phone will be able to operate in the European 3g frequencies, which most of them are at 2100.

  • 7. Re: HTC/T-mobile 3g operating frequencies
    philyew

    There is a frequency overlap between UMTS Band I (IMT) and Band IV (AWS) for download services, but each uses different channels.

     

    Also, while Band I is referred to as 2100, it also uses split upload/download frequencies. The upload frequency range is actually 1920–1980mhz, so unless the Wildfire has UMTS Band I it will not work on European networks.

  • 8. Re: HTC/T-mobile 3g operating frequencies

    in other words, no 3G outside US for the t-mobile version of Wildfire S?

  • 9. Re: HTC/T-mobile 3g operating frequencies
    philyew

    I just looked at the spec sheet for the Wildfire S and apparently it does have UMTS Band I, so there will be networks where 3G is possible, depending on the roaming agreements in place between TM USA and the native carrier.

  • 10. Re: HTC/T-mobile 3g operating frequencies

    Well that is great than, the roaming is not a consern, the phone will be unlocked to use local SIM's, (not sure who is crazy or rich enough to use roaming) the only qiestion was the 3g, but since there is a Band 1, its all good!

  • 11. Re: HTC/T-mobile 3g operating frequencies
    philyew

    Not sure how long you have been a customer, but TM have been known to refuse to unlock devices for new customers. Make absolutely sure they will do it before making any commitments.

     

    My suggestion is also to make sure you request the unlock code in plenty of time before your trip. The normal wait time to get the code emailed to you is 24-48 hours, but it took 72 hours for mine, and it may take up to a week in some cases, if they have to go to the manufacturer to get the code. They will only email the code, not text it or give it out over a voice call.

     

    You won't be able to do the unlock without using a SIM from another carrier, so I suggest you use a SIM from a friend with AT&T service. It's wise to do it at home because the unlock code doesn't always work. It didn't in my case, and I had them generate the code twice and also went to Samsung for help, all to no avail. In the end I had to use an app off the Android Market, which fortunately worked first time of asking, with no ill effects, but it was a risk I didn't want to take until I was desperate.

     

    Unfortunately, my trip had been arranged at very short notice and I couldn't request the code until I was overseas. The result was that I had to use wireless data roaming to retrieve my email (several attempts before the message arrived) and ran up a $100 data roaming bill in just three days doing virtually nothing else.

     

    Hard lesson: get everything sorted out before you travel.

  • 12. Re: HTC/T-mobile 3g operating frequencies

    Yeah, I'v been a TM customer for a long time, but even if they dont give it to me, there are plenty of online places that will unlock it for 20 bucks, that is not a problem, thank you again.

  • 13. Re: HTC/T-mobile 3g operating frequencies
    philyew

    Yup...but not all of them are honest! Good luck.

  • 14. Re: HTC/T-mobile 3g operating frequencies

    Please identify a T-Mobile phone that can use 1700 MHz today?

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