1 2 3 4 Previous Next 54 Replies Latest reply: May 8, 2013 8:43 PM by darnell Go to original post RSS
  • 30. Re: Non-replaceable battery -- DO NOT BUY!
    darnell

    Just spoke with HTC to confirm what I figured is the case.  They said if the battery dies while the device is under warranty, of course they'll replace it without added fees apart from you shipping to them.  If the device is not under warranty, you pay and the rate currently is still around what it has been for many years, ~$90.  (They told me about $90.  I know from having many HTC devices, that has been about the average for many years.)


    And the One uses a battery type that is not exactly like the type in some older devices.

     

    I've heard a lot of reasons why, but I know that devices I have with sealed a sealed battery last way longer than anything I have with a removable battery.

  • 31. Re: Non-replaceable battery -- DO NOT BUY!

    This subject is a moot point...

     

    Who really cares? If your going to get the phone everyone now knows you cant change out the battery for now..but now doesn't matter because you don't have to worry about it for years.

     

    Please I know people that still have iPhone 3 and have not changed the battery.

     

    Of course in a few years if and when you needed to change the battery anyone that works on Android phone could change it out for $20 bucks.

     

    Just like iPhone you can find of all kinds if company's that will change out the iPhone battery.

     

    Even YouTube on how with simple skills.

     

    How to Easily Replace an iPhone 4 Battery - YouTube

  • 32. Re: Non-replaceable battery -- DO NOT BUY!

    t&c wrote:

     

    This subject is a moot point...

     

    Who really cares? If your going to get the phone everyone now knows you cant change out the battery for now..but now doesn't matter because you don't have to worry about it for years.

     

    Please I know people that still have iPhone 3 and have not changed the battery.

     

    Of course in a few years if and when you needed to change the battery anyone that works on Android phone could change it out for $20 bucks.

     

    Just like iPhone you can find of all kinds if company's that will change out the iPhone battery.

     

    Even YouTube on how with simple skills.

     

    How to Easily Replace an iPhone 4 Battery - YouTube

    Right, that's for the iPhone, which is relatively easy.  The HTC One is a completely different beast.

  • 33. Re: Non-replaceable battery -- DO NOT BUY!

    So what you two want to argue that in two years someone like a 14 year old wont be able to change out the battery...

     

    Dude seriously...

     

    You two are not buying the phone so why does it matter?

  • 34. Re: Non-replaceable battery -- DO NOT BUY!

    I have a One.

     

    And have you seen the tear-down articles for the One?  I wouldn't trust a 14yr old anywhere near mine.

     

    http://www.ifixit.com/Teardown/HTC+One+Teardown/13494/1

     

    And those guys are experts.

     

    HTC One Repairability Score: One out of 10 (10 is easiest to repair)

    • Very, very difficult (possibly impossible?) to open the device without damaging the rear case. This makes every component extremely difficult to replace.
    • The battery is buried beneath the motherboard and adhered to the midframe, hindering its replacement.
    • The display assembly cannot be replaced without removing the rear case—this will make the most common repair, a damaged screen, nearly impossible.
    • Copper shielding on many components is difficult to remove and replace.
    • Solid external construction improves durability.
  • 35. Re: Non-replaceable battery -- DO NOT BUY!
    darnell

    oryan_dunn, both you and t&c have your points.  Because although it is very hard to open the device right now.  We know HTC is servicing HTC Ones right now.  So, the method they are using will eventually become public knowledge.  (Worst case, it can always be sent to HTC for service.)  And given the battery is nothing like the ones we're used to swapping in old devices, it very likely will be years before most of us need a replacement.

  • 36. Re: Non-replaceable battery -- DO NOT BUY!
    tidbits

    most devices I have owned the lithium batteries tend to last 4-5 years.  Only once where one lasted less than 3 years.  It won't be a problem for 95% of the users out there.  Most will get the latest and greatest before the battery goes bad.  the fixit score means nothing to 95% of the people in the world.

  • 37. Re: Non-replaceable battery -- DO NOT BUY!
    jtcarver

    Your right in that one,  any battery is only good for so many charge cycles,  the more you use it the quicker the battery is going to die.  You would figure that htc would put a lithium polymer battery in their device instead of a lithium ion which has a shorter lifespan. As far as battery life, I had an s3 and went through two batteries in less than a year (constantly using the phone), if it was an HTC with a non removable battery if be out a lot more than the 25 bucks the two batteries cost me. Personally I think htc does it so when the battery dies you are going to replace the phone.

  • 38. Re: Non-replaceable battery -- DO NOT BUY!
    tidbits

    It is a lithium polymer battery in the One. Even if it says ion on the spec sheet a polymer battery is still an ion battery.

  • 39. Re: Non-replaceable battery -- DO NOT BUY!
    flashfox

    Hmm... did you not do your homework first before paying the high price for the ONE? It was very clear everywhere that the battery was not replaceable. I don't know how you would have missed that even if you were not specifically looking for this.

  • 40. Re: Non-replaceable battery -- DO NOT BUY!
    theartiszan

    A lot of people tend to buy things without doing research first.

  • 41. Re: Non-replaceable battery -- DO NOT BUY!

    I agree with the original poster.  Considering the hefty price of the phone and everything HTC has at stake, excluding both user upgradeable memory AND user replaceable battery is baffling.  I could almost understand excluding one or the other, but not both.  The HTC Sensation had a great physical design, and batteries and memory card were easily accessible.

     

    My other beef with the HTC One is Sense 5.  It’s not a step forward  or back, but really a step sideways.  The Blinkfeed is a matter of user preference, yet HTC throws it in people’s faces.  This is surprising after the CEO’s recent comments about widgets. 


    The average person will see this phone expecting some of the comforts of their old smart phone, but upon opening the box, they will see a sealed piece of aluminum.  This will bother certain buyers and rightly so.  They will play with Sense and not understand why Blinkfeed won’t go away or why the large clock is everywhere.  They will be irritated by the oddly placed capacitive buttons and the useless HTC logo under the screen.


    Since average buyers are not going to troll the internet to read 50,000 reviews, I suspect carriers are going to process quite a few returns.  I don’t blame buyers for being disappointed in the phone.  I blame HTC for not delivering on buyers’ expectations.  The more expensive a phone is, the more people expect.  And one expectation for many is the ability to swap out a battery.  If the phone were cheaper, this “flaw” might be more forgivable.  But at $600, some will return it (or ignore it) rather than forgive it.  The HTC One is a good phone, but I think it missed the mark enough to make people hesitant to buy it.

  • 42. Re: Non-replaceable battery -- DO NOT BUY!
    tidbits

    Ironically most people won't care. Only techies care but they are the minority. If a techie ends up doing a return that's on them for not doing their homework.

  • 43. Re: Non-replaceable battery -- DO NOT BUY!
    21stnow

    Both the HTC One X and the HTC One S had non-removable batteries and lacked expandable memory, so this isn't new for HTC.  The iPhone has been a great selling smartphone for six years now.  Other high-end smartphones lack these two things, as well.

     

    If a buyer doesn't know that the HTC One doesn't have removable storage and expandable memory, these things can't be that important to the buyer.  These things are easily found online and only takes a view of one webpage to see this, and not 50,000 reviews.  Even more, if the customer orders this phone online from T-Mobile, there is a question and answer page that talks about these things.  The SIM card removal tool on the specs page should also be a clue.

     

    I thought that Samsung had to cease and desist on the blog plants that denigrated the HTC One.  I'm starting to think that this isn't the case.  Edit: maybe Samsung only stopped in Thailand and they are still doing this elsewhere.  Some of the posts that I'm reading do more than defy logic, they are outright unbelievable.

  • 44. Re: Non-replaceable battery -- DO NOT BUY!
    flashfox

    Agreed... add to this Google's flagship Nexus 4 and you can see the trend. Thinner more powerful phones require Li-Polymer type batteries as they can be molded to fit a case. Seems like this is the wave of the future.

     

    This being said, there is always a way to replace these batteries although not as easy as in the past. Third party shops pop up everywhere and offer this service. One of these exist in our mall. Granted, it costs more and you need to go there, but hey, it is doable (voids warranty though... but by the time we change the battery, who cares?)