1 2 Previous Next 21 Replies Latest reply: Apr 28, 2012 1:21 PM by danh4648 Go to original post RSS
  • 15. Re: Some Galaxy SII Questions

    I've been on Gmail for so long I forgot about POP3 and IMAP settings. But it turns out that I still do have some old fashioned IMAP accounts. What I did was set up Gmail to manage the IMAP accounts as I wanted and then forwarded them to my main email account. What's cool about the Gmail app though is that it knows which emails came from which accounts even thought they all display together. So when I reply to an email it comes from the original account with the appropriate address and signature. You can use the email app for old school email accounts but Android is all about Gmail. Take a moment to configure your Gmail accounts to unlock its full potential.

     

    When I changed Android phones all I had to do was enter my gmail info and it brought most everything over. There is a caveat though, with Android you can have both local phone contacts and Google contacts. Google will only bring over your Google contacts and not your local "non-cloud" data. But there is this little gem of an app that comes on your SII called "Kies AIr". It might not sound like much or be obvious what it does. What it does is turn your phone in to a webserver that can be accessed from any browser or any other Android phone running it. You have full access to your phone and its file system and you can transfer anything and everything you want just like it's any other device wirelessly. That is a huge difference between Android and iOS and it might take a little time to get your head around this difference. Once you do though, you won't want to go back to iTunes.

     

    Widgets on the lockscreen has not been a feature of Android in the past. Apple has been suing Samsung over various Android patents and making them remove features. Samsung though has recently registered a patent that covers a whole slew of lockscreen functions including notifications and application specific features. So look for these kinds of features in ICS and Samsung to return the favor to Apple and make them remove them from iOS. In the meantime there are other music apps that can do this today for free.

  • 16. Re: Some Galaxy SII Questions

    Ok thanks for all the advice, good stuff.

     

    I am thinking I am going to have to give up on this phone though.  I really like it a lot and would like to keep it as my phone but the battery is just horrible!  I went from 100% to 20% today in 5 hours!  I am a very light user, no streaming music, didnt do any calls today, some texting, navigated for 5 minutes..  I have tried everything, task killers, battery management apps, samsung power saver, I just can't get it to last a whole day no matter what I do.  Hardly ever had a problem with the iphone making it one day.

  • 17. Re: Some Galaxy SII Questions

    That's the sacrafice you make considering the GSII has a much larger screen and does do true multitasking. The only real way I could see your getting a full day out of this device, it very impractical, but putting the phone in airplane mode.  You'd get more than a day from it then but as I stated it's impractical.

  • 18. Re: Some Galaxy SII Questions

    I was ready to give up on this phone but then I refused to accept that battery life could be this poor.  I was losing 50% of battery while at work for 8 hours with phone in my pocket and barely using it!  So I decided to try out some different things to see if I could improve battery life.

     

    I had tried turning off auto-sync and background data, turning off gps, bluetooth, trying with and without power saving, turning off data, etc..

     

    Last night, I turned off wifi and in the 8 hours of work the phone only went down to 89%!!  So I am trying that for now and just turning on the wifi when I need it. 

     

    When my battery is draining fast, I noticed that "android os" is like 55% of battery usage even though I am not using phone.  I also noticed that wifi sharing is always running.  I did some research and some people believe that the wifi sharing is what causes the processor to never sleep and is what burns the battery.  That is what gave me the idea to shut off wifi and it seems to work so far.

     

    I am going to continue this way for a while but I am also debating rooting the phone so I can delete some tmobile apps and also freeze the "wifi sharing"

  • 19. Re: Some Galaxy SII Questions

    Update: I turned all the other settings back on (gps, background data, mobile data etc..) and left wifi off and the battery life has been great.  So for me, I have narrowed this problem down to a wifi problem.  Also I noticed that android OS has been using less than 10% of my battery life which is a big improvement. 

  • 20. Re: Some Galaxy SII Questions

    Using wifi when actually connected to a network will save a lot of battery, because it uses less power than the cell radio, but leaving it on when not connected will kill your battery because you're using both wifi and cellular radios at the same time, and the wifi may even be trying to boost its signal in an attempt to connect (which is the same reason cell radio will eat a lot of battery if you're in a bad signal area).

     

    Check out an app called JuiceDefender. It automatically turns off data when the screen is off, then turns it back on when it is on. It also will periodically turn cell data back on at intervals to "peek" for things like emails and status updates. People have varying degrees of success with it, but it's worth a try (the app's free).

     

    There's also such a thing as rooting the phone (like jailbreaking an iPhone), and if you learned to do that, you could install a custom kernel (which is the software layer between the OS and hardware) that undervolts the processor. Doing this, I maxed out at a day and a half with minimal use. But that's only if you feel like learning how to do it and are comfortable voiding your warranty.

  • 21. Re: Some Galaxy SII Questions

    jaylanphnx wrote:

     

    Using wifi when actually connected to a network will save a lot of battery, because it uses less power than the cell radio, but leaving it on when not connected will kill your battery because you're using both wifi and cellular radios at the same time, and the wifi may even be trying to boost its signal in an attempt to connect (which is the same reason cell radio will eat a lot of battery if you're in a bad signal area).

     

    Check out an app called JuiceDefender. It automatically turns off data when the screen is off, then turns it back on when it is on. It also will periodically turn cell data back on at intervals to "peek" for things like emails and status updates. People have varying degrees of success with it, but it's worth a try (the app's free).

     

    There's also such a thing as rooting the phone (like jailbreaking an iPhone), and if you learned to do that, you could install a custom kernel (which is the software layer between the OS and hardware) that undervolts the processor. Doing this, I maxed out at a day and a half with minimal use. But that's only if you feel like learning how to do it and are comfortable voiding your warranty.

     

    Actually, the battery drain I talk about was occuring at work and home, where I have a solid wifi connection the whole time.  The phone is just in standby most of the time.  I tried juice defender without much success.  For me it seems like there was some sort of issue with the wifi where even when phone screen was locked, it seems to be continually searching, even when I have a solid connection.  I don't know how else to explain it, since I switched off wifi, battery life has been great.  All my cpuspy and better battery settings look great and "android os" has been using less than 10% of battery life.

     

    I found an app called llama that lets you create events.  I created an event so that when the phone is locked, the wifi is shut off automatically.  So now I leave wifi on and let the app turn it on and off for me.  as been working great, very happy with the batter life of this phone now.

     

    The app is worth checking out, you can use it to automate all sorts of tasks and settings by time, location, etc..

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